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Africa | Woman's Ceremonial Skirt from the Bushong people of DR Congo | ca. early 20th century | Pounded and dyed inner bark (Ficus); piecing | This striking wraparound skirt was made for an aristocratic woman of the Bushong ruling group, possibly a member of the royal clan, since they were the only Kuba who were entitled to wear barkcloth, which was otherwise restricted to mourning and funerary rite.

Africa | Woman's Ceremonial Skirt from the Bushong people of DR Congo | ca. early 20th century | Pounded and dyed inner bark (Ficus); piecing | This striking wraparound skirt was made for an aristocratic woman of the Bushong ruling group, possibly a member of the royal clan, since they were the only Kuba who were entitled to wear barkcloth, which was otherwise restricted to mourning and funerary rite.

Africa | Details of Adinkra Printing. Adinkra cloth was originally only used as a mourning cloth. Today it is also worn on other special occasions.  | © Boakye family, Ntonso-Ashanti, Ghana

Africa | Details of Adinkra Printing. Adinkra cloth was originally only used as a mourning cloth. Today it is also worn on other special occasions. | © Boakye family, Ntonso-Ashanti, Ghana

To increase warmth and to recycle whatever fabrics they possessed, northern farmers’ wives and daughters developed sashiko. Textile fragments were patched together with a running stitch of heavy double cotton thread. The stitching itself helped to strengthen the fabric, multiple layers increased their warmth.Sashiko was produced almost exclusively in homes for the family’s personal use. ... in the twentieth century the style of stitching became more decorative.

To increase warmth and to recycle whatever fabrics they possessed, northern farmers’ wives and daughters developed sashiko. Textile fragments were patched together with a running stitch of heavy double cotton thread. The stitching itself helped to strengthen the fabric, multiple layers increased their warmth.Sashiko was produced almost exclusively in homes for the family’s personal use. ... in the twentieth century the style of stitching became more decorative.

Indigo dyeing with clamping technique (clothespins)

the modern natural dyer book and kit giveaway

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APART - Vietnamese textiles: different places / cultures represented through fabrics, patterns, etc.

Africa | Adire cloth from the Yoruba people of Nigeria | Late 20th century | Cotton; plain weave patterned with hand drawn starch resist, indigo dyed

Africa | Adire cloth from the Yoruba people of Nigeria | Late 20th century | Cotton; plain weave patterned with hand drawn starch resist, indigo dyed

Africa | Stitch dying resist technique. Wolof people, Saint Louis, Senegal. ca early 1900s | Charles A Beving collection at British Museum

Africa | Stitch dying resist technique. Wolof people, Saint Louis, Senegal. ca early 1900s | Charles A Beving collection at British Museum

Africa | Mud cloth from the Bamana women of Mali | ca. mid 20th century | Strip woven cotton with dense application of iron rich mud to the mordanted cotton cloth results in intricate negative pattern of exposed bleached area.

Africa | Mud cloth from the Bamana women of Mali | ca. mid 20th century | Strip woven cotton with dense application of iron rich mud to the mordanted cotton cloth results in intricate negative pattern of exposed bleached area.

Africa | Detail from a piece of Mud cloth from the Bamana women of Mali | 20th century | Strip woven cotton with dense application of iron rich mud to the mordanted cotton cloth results in intricate negative pattern of exposed bleached area.

Africa | Detail from a piece of Mud cloth from the Bamana women of Mali | 20th century | Strip woven cotton with dense application of iron rich mud to the mordanted cotton cloth results in intricate negative pattern of exposed bleached area.