Snow "waves".  Sun dog!

Snow waves and sun dog.ice crystals in the air as the sun is low in the sky can create the right conditions for this beautiful display around the sun called sun dog.

Sky Phenomena: Sun Dogs: "...an atmospheric phenomenon that creates bright spots of light in the sky, often on a luminous ring or halo on either side of the sun.    Sundogs may appear as a colored patch of light to the left or right of the sun, 22° distant and at the same distance above the horizon as the sun, and in ice halos. They can be seen anywhere in the world during any season, but they are not always obvious or bright. Sundogs are best seen and are most conspicuous when the sun is…

Sundog Light Phenomenon, Manitoba, Canada, 2005 Photograph by Norbert Rosing A solar phenomenon known as a sundog arcs over the tundra in.

Alaskan Moondogs

Alaskan Moondogs : Whats happened to the sky? Moonlight illuminates a snowy scene in this night land and skyscape made on 2013 January from Lower Miller Creek, Alaska, USA. Overexposed near the mountainous western horizon is the first quarter Moon.

Sundog taken at the beach of Tulum in Quintana Roo in northwestern Yucatan, Mexico    And finally, a rainbow that is no rainbow. An upside-down rainbow is actually a rare optical illusion called a sundog. Sundogs appear when a low sun catches the atmosphere’s thin vapour of ice crystals, six miles above the Earth’s surface. The sun’s rays are refracted by the sun and produce something like a halo around it. Often, it appears white but can also display a spectrum of colours.

Tulum, Yucatan, Mexico: An upside-down rainbow is a rare optical illusion called a sundog.~~♡~~I enjoyed the Myan Ruins in Tulum and the water was beautiful

“A photographer in Finland was at the right place at the right time and  got to experience a very rare sight. Most of us have seen sun pillars,  or sundogs, or even a halo around the sun, well this man saw 13  different optical phenomena all at once. Ice crystals that create  colored or white arcs/spots in the sky produce these types of  atmospheric phenomena. Many are usually near the sun but others are  scattered elsewhere. The particular shape and orientation of the  crystals are respon

A sun dog or sundog, scientific name parhelion is an atmospheric phenomenon that creates bright spots of light in the sky.

Moondog, Moon Dog or Mockmoon

Alaskan Moondogs : Whats happened to the sky? Moonlight illuminates a snowy scene in this night land and skyscape made on 2013 January from Lower Miller Creek, Alaska, USA. Overexposed near the mountainous western horizon is the first quarter Moon.

Parhelic arc over the Dead Sea.  Halo-sun dog

Parhelic circle - A parhelic circle is a halo, an optical phenomenon appearing as a horizontal white line on the same altitude as the sun, or occasionally the Moon.

Sun Dogs    A sun dog or sundog is a common bright circular (or symmetrical) spot on a solar halo. It is an atmospheric optical phenomenon primarily associated with the reflection or refraction of sunlight by small ice crystals making up cirrus or cirrostratus clouds. Often, two sun dogs can be seen (one on each side of the sun) simultaneously.

Haloes Haloes Like rainbows, haloes are formed around the Sun due to moisture (in this case ice crystals) being refracted from the Sun.

Parhelion / sun dogs over sea ice and a polar bear mother and cubs. Churchill. Manitoba. Canada.

Parhelion / sun dogs over sea ice and a polar bear mother and cubs.

Halos, caused by the combined glints of billions of ice crystals, are more common than you think. A halo can be seen 100 times a year. Next time the sun is shining hold up your hand to cover the sun and you may see a ring-like halo, or a pair of sun dogs. If you see the sun dogs also check overhead to see if the upside-down rainbow-smile called a "circumzenithal arc" is visible. This image is a computer simulation of some of the halos and other arcs.

Halos, caused by the combined glints of billions of ice crystals, are more common than you think. A halo can be seen 100 times a year. Next time the sun is shining hold up your hand to cover the sun and you may see a ring-like halo, or a pair of sun dogs. If you see the sun dogs also check overhead to see if the upside-down rainbow-smile called a "circumzenithal arc" is visible. This image is a computer simulation of some of the halos and other arcs.

Sun-dogs or parhelia (from the Greek “beside the sun”) are the two bright patches of light that are occasionally seen to flank the rising or setting sun.

Sun-dogs or parhelia (from the Greek “beside the sun”) are the two bright patches of light that are occasionally seen to flank the rising or setting sun.

Sun dogs, also called mock suns, are colored, luminous spots caused by the refraction of light by six-sided ice crystals in the atmosphere. These bright spots form in the solar halo at points that are 22 degrees on either side of the sun and at the same elevation as the sun. Below is a closeup of a sundog to the left of the sun.

Sun dogs, also called mock suns, are colored, luminous spots caused by the refraction of light by six-sided ice crystals in the atmosphere. These bright spots form in the solar halo at points that are 22 degrees on either side of the sun and at the same elevation as the sun. Below is a closeup of a sundog to the left of the sun.

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