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    • 42 Pins

    Seven year old Dorothy Dandridge on the right. She’s pictured her with her sister Vivian, mother Ruby (upper left), and her mother’s “companion…” Geneva Williams.

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    India Gibbs

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    Laurette Hunkson - One of the first African American Girl Scouts

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    Gwendolyn Brooks

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    Satchel Paige

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    Say it loud...

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    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. reacts in St. Augustine, Fla., after learning that the senate passsed the civil rights bill, June 19, 1964.

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    Flapper.

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    Mary Fields was widely beloved. She was admired in Montana for holding her own & living her own way despite odds being stacked against her. She dressed in the comfortable clothes of a man, including a wool cap & boots, & she wore a revolver strapped around her waist under her apron. At 200 lbs, she was said to be a match for any two men in Montana. She had a standing bet that she could knock a man out with one punch, and she never lost a dime to anyone foolish enough to take her up on that bet.

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    Cotillion!

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    Jenny Smith Fletcher Charter member of AME Church was the first postmistress and schoolteacher in Nicodemus, Kansas. She was also one of the original charter members of the A.M.E. Church. Mrs. Fletcher was the daughter of W. H. Smith, founder of Nicodemus.

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    Isaac and Rosa , slave children from New Orleans. Pictures from an 1860s publicity campaign to raise money for struggling public schools for emancipated slaves. They felt that picturing the darker slaves with their caucasion looking brethren would generate sympathy and prompt additional donations. Interesting...I did not know this!

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    Gregory Hines was awesome!

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    Field of Dreams - African American migrant worker hoeing cotton, 1938.

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    African-American sharecroppers couple, Oklahoma, 1914.

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    The History of Slavery in America

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    Marcus Garvey

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    African American Indian

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    Julia S. Tutwiler, educator, writer, and activist for the rights of African-Americans, prisoners, and women.

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    The Black History of the White House by Clarence Lusane. For many Americans, the White House stands as a symbol of liberty and justice. But its gleaming facade hides harsh realities, from the slaves who built the home to the presidents who lived there and shaped the country's racial history, often for the worse. In The Black History of the White House, Clarence Lusane traces the path of race relations in America by telling a very specific history — the stories of those African-Americans...

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    Top 25 most famous redheads listverse.com/... - #23. Malcolm X (1925 – 1965) – African American spiritual leader of the Nation of Islam during the American Civil Rights movement. Born Malcolm Little, he converted to Islam while in prison and became a powerful activist for black Americans until his unsolved assassination in 1965.

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    Beautiful Lena Horne....who broke racial barriers for African Americans when she signed a contract with a major Hollywood studio in the 1940's. Died ages 92.

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    Josephine Baker was the first African American female to star in a motion picture, to integrate an American concert hall, and to become a world-famous entertainer.  Not only was Josephine beautiful, but she brought incredible amounts of change to the US for African Americans.  After growing up being abused by her white female employer, Josephine went to to live as a child of the streets, using street performances to support herself.  She soon became the “highest paid chor...

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    Rosa Parks

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