9 ways to support your BFF who was diagnosed with breast cancer, from Cleveland Clinic.

9 Best Ways to Support a BFF Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

When a friend or loved one is diagnosed with cancer, it's hard to know what to do. Here's an infographic with ways to support someone with breast cancer.

Consult with a genetic counselor to determine if genetic testing is right for you. Click to learn more. #BringYourBrave

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women with specific patterns of breast, ovarian, tubal, or peritoneal cancer in their family history consider genetic counseling and testing for BRCA gene mutations.

“My family history of breast cancer doesn’t predict my future, but it does help me make more informed decisions.” –Lisa, 42 #BringYourBrave

Because several of her family members were diagnosed with breast cancer, Lisa wanted to find out her personal risk. She started by learning her family history.

Jewish women: learn more about why you may be at higher risk for breast cancer at a young age. #BringYourBrave

Jewish women: learn more about why you may be at higher risk for breast cancer at a young age.

Breast cancer screening and treatment: One size doesn’t fit all. Learn more at www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/.

Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Getting mammograms regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer.

Exercising regularly is one way to help reduce your #BreastCancer risk. Repin and set aside some time to move today! #BringYourBrave

You can lower your risk of getting breast cancer at a young age by making healthy lifestyle choices.

Click for steps to assess your BRCA gene mutation risk using Know:BRCA. #BringYourBrave

Did you know that BRCA gene mutations greatly increase your risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers? The Know:BRCA Assessment can help you assess your risk of having a BRCA mutation.

Want to learn more about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer? @forceempowered has you covered. #BringYourBrave

Want to learn more about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer? has you covered.

Previvors: What advice would you give to someone who tested positive for a #BRCA gene mutation? Comment below. #BringYourBrave

Marleah’s Story from CDC’s Bring Your Brave Campaign

Previvors: What advice would you give to someone who tested positive for a gene mutation?

Nearly 11% of all breast cancer cases affect women under the age of 45. Get the scoop on hereditary breast cancer and BRCA genes from #BringYourBrave.

Nearly of all breast cancer cases affect women under the age of Get the scoop on hereditary breast cancer and BRCA genes from

During her senior year of college, Meagan noticed an irregular pea-sized lump in her breast. Click for her story. #BringYourBrave

Meagan’s Story from CDC’s Bring Your Brave Campaign

The story of Meagan, a woman who decided to have a lump in her breast checked through ultrasound. The test results found that the lump was not cancerous.

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