Celtic Guide

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Traditional May Day included dancing and the Morris Dancers, crowning of the May Queen, with lots of festivity and a big feast at the end. By Alison MacRae. Read more in Celtic Guide's Feb 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Traditional May Day included dancing and the Morris Dancers, crowning of the May Queen, with lots of festivity and a big feast at the end. By Alison MacRae. Read more in Celtic Guide's Feb 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Irish mythology and lore is replete with instances of how important cycles were to the ancient Gaels of the Emerald Isle.   As with most cultures, it governed their calendars and religious festivals, but it went much deeper than that, by governing most every aspect of their lives, including the supernatural and the martial. Read the full article in Celtic Guide's February 2016 issue.  All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Irish mythology and lore is replete with instances of how important cycles were to the ancient Gaels of the Emerald Isle. As with most cultures, it governed their calendars and religious festivals, but it went much deeper than that, by governing most every aspect of their lives, including the supernatural and the martial. Read the full article in Celtic Guide's February 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Irish legends and tales are one of the only clues we have to life before the arrival of Christian monks to the island.   The people who lived there before “the Age of Saints and Scholars,” as this time was known, did not write down their tales. Instead, the stories were passed verbally from generation to generation. Read the rest of this article in Celtic Guide"s February 2016 issue.   All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Irish legends and tales are one of the only clues we have to life before the arrival of Christian monks to the island. The people who lived there before “the Age of Saints and Scholars,” as this time was known, did not write down their tales. Instead, the stories were passed verbally from generation to generation. Read the rest of this article in Celtic Guide"s February 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Wherever she is found, the Cailleach is mainly known for two things: her identity as a hag and her association with winter. However, like most deities, she is complex with multiple associations. Read the full article in Celtic Guide's February 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Wherever she is found, the Cailleach is mainly known for two things: her identity as a hag and her association with winter. However, like most deities, she is complex with multiple associations. Read the full article in Celtic Guide's February 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

This is the story of a people called MacLachlan.  The MacLachlans were among the earliest settlers who came from a region of Ireland called Tirconnel, and with the renowned Fergus mac Earc and his two brothers, in the early years of the eighth century, helped colonize the Scottish kingdom of Dalriada. Read more in Celtic Guide Feb 2016 FREE at www.celticguide.com

This is the story of a people called MacLachlan. The MacLachlans were among the earliest settlers who came from a region of Ireland called Tirconnel, and with the renowned Fergus mac Earc and his two brothers, in the early years of the eighth century, helped colonize the Scottish kingdom of Dalriada. Read more in Celtic Guide Feb 2016 FREE at www.celticguide.com

Shown here are photographs of the four seasons with nearly the exact same view of Castlelaw Hill in Glencorse, part of the Pentland Hills of Scotland. By Cameron Morrison. Read more in Celtic Guide's Feb 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Shown here are photographs of the four seasons with nearly the exact same view of Castlelaw Hill in Glencorse, part of the Pentland Hills of Scotland. By Cameron Morrison. Read more in Celtic Guide's Feb 2016 issue. All issues are FREE at www.celticguide.com

Nothing says Seasons and Cycles for Celts better than St. Patrick’s Day, and no parade is there larger than the New York City St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Also, we have two really great articles on the roles of Seasons and Cycles in Ireland, as well as others from Celtic countries around the world. A very exciting event for us is our interview with “The Barataria Project,” out of Madrid, Spain. This makes the 16th country we’ve partnered with to celebrate Celtic ties. Read FREE…

Nothing says Seasons and Cycles for Celts better than St. Patrick’s Day, and no parade is there larger than the New York City St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Also, we have two really great articles on the roles of Seasons and Cycles in Ireland, as well as others from Celtic countries around the world. A very exciting event for us is our interview with “The Barataria Project,” out of Madrid, Spain. This makes the 16th country we’ve partnered with to celebrate Celtic ties. Read FREE…

Going to Saveock is a bit like travelling back in time; seeing a peep of a thatched roundhouse roof only adds to the impression that you are somewhere else. Read the rest of this article in our December 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com

Going to Saveock is a bit like travelling back in time; seeing a peep of a thatched roundhouse roof only adds to the impression that you are somewhere else. Read the rest of this article in our December 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com

I’ve long been proud to say that I’ve met and shook hands with some of the best Celtic fiddlers in the world, from Natalie MacMaster to Alasdair Fraser, from Jeremy Kittel to Melinda Crawford.  I met Bonnie Rideout at the Edinboro Highland Games, and heard her blow the audience away with a wonderful song she had written. Now I get to ask her a few questions.  Read the rest of the interview in Celtic Guide's December 2015 issue. FREE at www.celticguide.com

I’ve long been proud to say that I’ve met and shook hands with some of the best Celtic fiddlers in the world, from Natalie MacMaster to Alasdair Fraser, from Jeremy Kittel to Melinda Crawford. I met Bonnie Rideout at the Edinboro Highland Games, and heard her blow the audience away with a wonderful song she had written. Now I get to ask her a few questions. Read the rest of the interview in Celtic Guide's December 2015 issue. FREE at www.celticguide.com

Going to Saveock is a bit like travelling back in time; seeing a peep of a thatched roundhouse roof only adds to the impression that you are somewhere else. Read the rest of this article in our December 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com

Going to Saveock is a bit like travelling back in time; seeing a peep of a thatched roundhouse roof only adds to the impression that you are somewhere else. Read the rest of this article in our December 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com

Orkney legend tells of a weird and horrible creature called the Stoor Worm hatched by an evil spirit and set in the oceans deep to wreak havoc on sailors and island folk. Considered one of the nine plagues of humankind, the Stoor Worm with a giant gaping mouth, deadly forked tongue, and poison breath, was a destroyer of ships, cities, castles, and honorable women. From Celtic Guide Oct 2015 issue. FREE www.celticguide.com

Orkney legend tells of a weird and horrible creature called the Stoor Worm hatched by an evil spirit and set in the oceans deep to wreak havoc on sailors and island folk. Considered one of the nine plagues of humankind, the Stoor Worm with a giant gaping mouth, deadly forked tongue, and poison breath, was a destroyer of ships, cities, castles, and honorable women. From Celtic Guide Oct 2015 issue. FREE www.celticguide.com

Most fans of Celtic culture already know that Dracula is the Irish creation of Bram Stoker, who wrote that scary novel, but there’s also a vampire that resides right smack in the middle of Ireland. Dearg-due, an Irish name meaning “red blood sucker,” is a female demon that seduces men and then drains them of their blood. Read more in Celtic Guide October 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com Print copies for sale through Amazon: http://astore.amazon.com/celticguide-20

Most fans of Celtic culture already know that Dracula is the Irish creation of Bram Stoker, who wrote that scary novel, but there’s also a vampire that resides right smack in the middle of Ireland. Dearg-due, an Irish name meaning “red blood sucker,” is a female demon that seduces men and then drains them of their blood. Read more in Celtic Guide October 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com Print copies for sale through Amazon: http://astore.amazon.com/celticguide-20

Jack was often used as a euphemism for a spirit. It could sometimes be a clownish figure, a good spirit or a bad spirit, a nature guardian, or other folkloric figures. You see more examples of Jack as a spirit in other folkloric motifs such as Jack in the Green (and a myriad of other Jacks in British folklore: Jack Frost, Jack-in Irons, Jack o’Legs, and many more). Read more in Celtic Guide's October 2015 issue, all issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com

Jack was often used as a euphemism for a spirit. It could sometimes be a clownish figure, a good spirit or a bad spirit, a nature guardian, or other folkloric figures. You see more examples of Jack as a spirit in other folkloric motifs such as Jack in the Green (and a myriad of other Jacks in British folklore: Jack Frost, Jack-in Irons, Jack o’Legs, and many more). Read more in Celtic Guide's October 2015 issue, all issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com

The Celtic Guide Halloween issue is here! This is our most popular and most anticipated issue every year. Read it for FREE at www.celticguide.com

The Celtic Guide Halloween issue is here! This is our most popular and most anticipated issue every year. Read it for FREE at www.celticguide.com

The Owlman of Mawnan  The first Owlman sightings occurred in 1976, by two young girls (aged nine and twelve) walking through the woods near Mawnan Smith Church who claimed to have seen a winged creature hovering over the church tower. Several months later, another young girl, Sally Chapman (aged fourteen) who was camping in the same woods with a friend, had a close encounter with the same creature.  Read more in Celtic Guide October 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at…

The Owlman of Mawnan The first Owlman sightings occurred in 1976, by two young girls (aged nine and twelve) walking through the woods near Mawnan Smith Church who claimed to have seen a winged creature hovering over the church tower. Several months later, another young girl, Sally Chapman (aged fourteen) who was camping in the same woods with a friend, had a close encounter with the same creature. Read more in Celtic Guide October 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at…

Here's the latest Postcard from Obie! This one is featured in Celtic Guide's October 2015 issue.   All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com  Print copies for sale through Amazon: http://astore.amazon.com/celticguide-20

Here's the latest Postcard from Obie! This one is featured in Celtic Guide's October 2015 issue. All issues are always FREE at www.celticguide.com Print copies for sale through Amazon: http://astore.amazon.com/celticguide-20