Martin Luther King Jr. - B.A. in Sociology, Morehouse College, Class of 1948..

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There were a lot of African American cowboys. Some of them very famous in their time. They have been left out of the history books.

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A group photo of the first eight African American police hired by the Atlanta Police Department in 1948. The last of this group, Johnnie P. Jones (2nd from the right in the back row) died on February 27, 2013 at the age of 93. Because of segregation these officers could not carry a gun or arrest a white person. http://www.obitoftheday.com/post/44631988149/johnniepjones#

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Two influential leaders who were sadly taken too soon for speaking truths many were afraid to hear. (Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.)

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Dr. Dorothy Lavinia Brown (January 7, 1919 – June 13, 2004, also known as "Dr. D.", was an African-American surgeon, legislator, and teacher. She was the first female surgeon of African-American ancestry from the Southeastern United States. She was also the first African American to serve in the Tennessee General Assembly having been elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives.

Dorothy Lavinia Brown - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

nlm.nih.gov

On February 18, 1965, a young man named Jimmie Lee Jackson was shot and killed by a member of the Alabama State Police during a non-violent civil rights demonstration in Selma, Alabama. Seventeen days later, 525 civil rights activists marched from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in protest of that killing. They were attacked by state and local police armed with billy clubs, whips, and tear gas. That day—March 7, 1965—would come to be known as “Bloody Sunday.”

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The 3rd largest city in the USA was founded by a Black man. Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable was first settler in Chicago, arriving from Europe in 1770s. He married a Native Potawatomi Indian woman (Kittahawa) & founded first trading post in area. The Town of Chicago was organized with a population of 350, August 1833. Born in Saint-Marc, Saint-Domingue (now Haiti), he built the first permanent settlement at the mouth of the river just east of present Michigan Avenue Bridge on the north bank.

Chicago was founded by a black man - The Patriotic Vanguard

thepatrioticvanguard.com

In 100 Amazing Facts About The Negro, J.A. Rogers reports that in 1923, Europeans first discovered “a hitherto unknown Negro race, the Nakhis, 200,000 in number, in Southern China.” Here are some black Chinese Na-khis, in the Chinese Temple of Heaven, in the year 1920. I wonder what happened to them all?

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Sally Hemings was a mixed race slave who belonged to President Thomas Jefferson. She gave birth to six children with Jefferson and got the chance to see her children live as free people before her death. #mixedchickshistorymonth #sallyhemings

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50 Shades of BLACK Presents: History Makers -a 2014 Black History Month Tribute Poster - free download

History Makers Poster

50shadesofblack.com

Varnette Honeywood passed away on September 12, 2010 at age 59. An artist whose paintings hung on the walls of the set of The Cosby Show and whose colorful images depicted black family life.

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pinner wrote: When slaves were captured, their hair was cut off, in order to begin the process of eradicating their sense of culture and identity. They were then given head-wraps to use protect against harsh weather and the spread of head lice. Originally, these head-wraps were given to both sexes but later were used exclusively by women.

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Patricia Roberts Harris; the first black female ambassador; first black female law school dean in the country; first black female in a presidential cabinet

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♍ Christine King Farris (born Willie Christine King on 9-11-1927, in Atlanta, GA) is the eldest and only living sibling of the late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. She teaches at Spelman College and is the author of several books and a public speaker on various topics, including the King family, multicultural education, and teaching. She married Isaac Newton Farris on 8-19-60. They had two children: Angela Farris-Watkins and Isaac Newton Farris, Jr., who currently serves as CEO of the King Cent...

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Andrew York, black slave to William Clark and who was an invaluable member of the Lewis Clark Expedition. A hunter explorer, he helped to survey and even saved the lives of others in the expedition on numerous occasions. What must it have been like to return to slavery after 2 years of greater respect...to be the only member of the expedition not to receive recognition, money and land let alone his freedom. (This statue by Ed Hamilton stands on the Riverfront Plaza in Louisville, Kentucky...

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Delilah L. Beasley. "She was the first black woman to write regularly for a major daily newspaper when her celebrated column, 'Activities Among Negroes' started in the Oakland Tribune in 1923. She continued her careful coverage of the black community until shortly before her death in 1934. She was instrumental in persuading the national press to stop using racial slurs...[and] became an outspoken activist for civil rights for both black people and women."

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Sarah Vaughan, in Newark, NJ, in her dressing room in Chicago, 1948.

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Gordon Parks captures Lorraine Hansberry chatting with Harry Belafonte (Sidney Poitier is in the rear and actor Godfrey Cambridge) at a party in honor of Ms. Hansberry’s smash Broadway play, ‘A Raisin in the Sun,’ at Sardi’s in New York City in March 1959. Photo: Gordon Parks/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images.

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First African American women to vote in Ettrick, Virginia, 1920 • These women, left to right, are Eva Conner, Evie Carpenter, Odelle Green, Virginia Mary Branch, Anna Lindsay, Edna Colson, Edwina Wright, Johnella Frazer, and Nannie Nichols

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Marcus Garvey and the King of Dahomey Marcus Garvey with Prince Kojo Tovalou-Houenou of Dahomey, called the “Garvey of Africa”, and George O. Marke. New York August 31, 1924

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life View post → Members of the U.S. Army Air Corps’ legendary 99th Pursuit Squadron, the Tuskegee Airmen, receive instruction about wind currents from a lieutenant in 1942. The Tuskegee fliers — the nation’s first African American air squadron — served with distinction in the segregated American military.

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Harlem Renaissance Novel by Claude McKay Is Discovered - NYTimes.com

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"Educator Charlotte Hawkins Brown on her wedding day, 1912. Founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute in North Carolina, Ms. Brown was also a suffragist who worked for black women to have the same rights black men and white women were fighting for in the early 20th century. She was also the great aunt of singer Natalie Cole. She raised Natalie’s mother Maria and her sisters (her brother’s children) when their mother died in childbirth."

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Thurgood Marshall sworn in to the Supreme Court. Oct 2, 1967| African American Registry

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William Harvey Carney was an African American soldier during the American Civil War. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Battle of Fort Wagner. Born: February 29, 1840, Norfolk Died: December 8, 1908, Boston Buried: New Bedford Awards: Medal of Honor

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