Gertrud Vasegaard (1913-2007) was a third-generation Danish potter.

Gertrud Vasegaard (1913-2007) was a third-generation Danish potter.

Beatrice Wood:  When asked the secret of her longevity, she would simply offer “art books, chocolates and young men”.

Beatrice Wood: When asked the secret of her longevity, she would simply offer “art books, chocolates and young men”.

Two-Gun Nan Aspinwall's magnum opus came in 1910-11 when she rode from San Francisco to New York on her mare, Lady Ellen, covering 4496 miles and taking 180 days in the saddle. At 31 years old, she became the first woman to ride from coast to coast. She did it wearing pants and split skirts, riding astride, which was likely still illegal in some parts of the country. She did it packing a pistol, which she used on at least two occasions to shoot up inhospitable towns. She made the ride alone.

Two-Gun Nan Aspinwall's magnum opus came in 1910-11 when she rode from San Francisco to New York on her mare, Lady Ellen, covering 4496 miles and taking 180 days in the saddle. At 31 years old, she became the first woman to ride from coast to coast. She did it wearing pants and split skirts, riding astride, which was likely still illegal in some parts of the country. She did it packing a pistol, which she used on at least two occasions to shoot up inhospitable towns. She made the ride alone.

"Corgis are enchanted.  You need only to see them in the moonlight to know this." -- Tasha Tudor

"Corgis are enchanted. You need only to see them in the moonlight to know this." -- Tasha Tudor

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Elderly man knitting garments during drive to provide goods to servicemen during the war. Knitting doesn't have to be just for girls!

Portrait of Bill Traylor by Charles Shannon ca. 1939.    "Bill Traylor (1854?–1949) was born into slavery on a plantation in Alabama. After emancipation, he continued to live and work on the plantation until sometime before 1928, when he moved permanently to Montgomery..." --The High Museum of Art

Portrait of Bill Traylor by Charles Shannon ca. 1939. "Bill Traylor (1854?–1949) was born into slavery on a plantation in Alabama. After emancipation, he continued to live and work on the plantation until sometime before 1928, when he moved permanently to Montgomery..." --The High Museum of Art

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