Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America.  This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

The Charleston Museum’s Historic Textiles Collection contains a remarkable assortment of wedding attire and accessories, most of which relates directly to South Carolina and the Lowcountry. This collection includes over 80 gowns, dating from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth centuries, as well as veils, shoes, fans, and men’s attire.

The Charleston Museum’s Historic Textiles Collection contains a remarkable assortment of wedding attire and accessories, most of which relates directly to South Carolina and the Lowcountry. This collection includes over 80 gowns, dating from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth centuries, as well as veils, shoes, fans, and men’s attire.

Church Street Print

Church Street Print

The Rice Spoon is a traditional and beautiful Lowcountry utensil. As Charleston historically thrived on rice crops, these large spoons were often used to serve the popular food item during meals. Due to its historic significance and beauty, it stands as a token item in many Charlestonian’s homes today. This Rice Spoon makes a beautiful gift that adds a Lowcountry flare to any kitchen or dinner table.

The Rice Spoon is a traditional and beautiful Lowcountry utensil. As Charleston historically thrived on rice crops, these large spoons were often used to serve the popular food item during meals. Due to its historic significance and beauty, it stands as a token item in many Charlestonian’s homes today. This Rice Spoon makes a beautiful gift that adds a Lowcountry flare to any kitchen or dinner table.

This little fox is a handmade original from local Charleston company. Each toy is handmade, making them unique gifts and one-of-kind friends. His plush, huggable body and his hand-stitched eyes and nose make him a sweet and safe playmate for children. Being a fox from the Lowcountry, he shows his support for our environment in his repurposed T-shirt.

This little fox is a handmade original from local Charleston company. Each toy is handmade, making them unique gifts and one-of-kind friends. His plush, huggable body and his hand-stitched eyes and nose make him a sweet and safe playmate for children. Being a fox from the Lowcountry, he shows his support for our environment in his repurposed T-shirt.

This little piggy makes a great friend to any owner. He’s cuddly, plush, and super soft.  A proud Charleston Native, he’s made right here in our favorite city. He’s one of a kind, handmade by the Team Fink toymakers of Charleston. His hand-stitched eyes and nose make him a safe playmate for children and he’s a friend to our environment in his repurposed T-shirt.

This little piggy makes a great friend to any owner. He’s cuddly, plush, and super soft. A proud Charleston Native, he’s made right here in our favorite city. He’s one of a kind, handmade by the Team Fink toymakers of Charleston. His hand-stitched eyes and nose make him a safe playmate for children and he’s a friend to our environment in his repurposed T-shirt.

This catalog features Charleston silver and other highly regarded silversmith-related historical objects from the collections of The Charleston Museum. It includes pieces both manufactured by local artisans and imported by local retailers. Each is identified by the name of the object (s), maker(s) and date(s), city of origin, and dimensions.

This catalog features Charleston silver and other highly regarded silversmith-related historical objects from the collections of The Charleston Museum. It includes pieces both manufactured by local artisans and imported by local retailers. Each is identified by the name of the object (s), maker(s) and date(s), city of origin, and dimensions.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

Maria Martin (1796-1863) was the sister-in-law, and later wife, of Reverend John Bachman. She began her artistic career creating botanical paintings for John James Audubon’s Birds of America. This coaster features butterfly renderings that were taken directly from two of Maria Martin’s practice sketchbooks. These special practice books were donated by the descendants of the Bachman/Audubon family and are now located in The Charleston Museum’s Archives.

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