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Mad about Mad Men


Mad about Mad Men

  • 29 Pins

The Real Mad Men by Andrew Cracknell

The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook by Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin

Analyzing Mad Men Edited by Scott F. Stoddart

Breakfast at Tiffanys

#JackLemmon and #ShirleyMaclaine #apartment #billywilder. One Great Film!!!

The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956) Gregory Peck (Actor), Jennifer Jones (Actor), Nunnally Johnson (Director)

The Fashion File by Janie Bryant

Mad Men Unbuttoned by Natasha Vargas-Cooper

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    This just-released history was adapted from Vargas-Cooper’s Footnotes of Mad Men blog, an addictive read that examines the cultural context of the series in all its delicious minutia. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

From Those Wonderful Folks who gave you Pearl Harbor by Jerry Della Femina

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carre

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    What was going through Don’s head when he retreated to California and picked Megan over Faye? Jezebel pointed out that this book (and Faye’s own words) may have had something to do with it: “It makes sense that he was reading John le Carré’s The Spy Who Came in from the Cold when he decided he was going to take Faye’s advice and take his head out of the sand (and straight up into the clouds), as the novel deals with methods being morally inconsistent with values. Remember when Megan said, a few episodes back, that she and Don are both alike because neither of them value the sentimental?” Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    When you’ve got a highly literate TV that’s also obsessed with American identity, there’s no getting around endless Mark Twain references. We heard Lane Pryce talking about the book in Season 3 — not coincidentally around the same time he got together with an African-American Playboy bunny, Toni. In the final episode of Season 4, it’s in the hands of Henry Francis, whose embrace of the novel may have something to do with his unhappiness at poor Clara’s dismissal. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Games People Play by Eric Berne

The Chrysanthemum and the Sword by Ruth Benedict

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    Is there any greater portent of total familial meltdown than Gibbon’s 18th-century masterpiece in the hands of little Sally Draper? Yes, that is the bedtime story she reads aloud to her beloved Grandpa Gene early in season three. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

The Group by Mary McCarthy

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    Undoubtedly part of the wising up process for Bryn Mawr grad Betty, The Group is a quick, gossipy, but also smart and satirical novel about a gaggle of Vassar grads and their largely unhappy adult lives. It’s just the kind of downer we can imagine her savoring in season three. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Confessions of an Advertising Man by David Ogilvy

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    This advertising handbook made the rounds of the Sterling Cooper offices during the show’s third season. Roger Sterling’s brief review: “It’s the book everybody writes… It should be called A Thousand Reasons I’m so Great.” Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

The Agony and the Ecstasy by Irving Stone

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    What better book for Peggy’s devoutly Catholic mother to be reading than Stone’s Michelangelo novel? Knowing Katherine Olson, she probably chose it explicitly to make her daughter feel guilty for having a baby out of wedlock. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Ship of Fools by Katherine Anne Porter

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    Betty Draper is no lightweight reader, either. In the midst of her season two marriage collapse (not to be confused with her season three marriage collapse), she hunkers down with this cheery Nazi allegory. It was the year’s bestselling novel. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Meditations in an Emergency by Frank O'Hara

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    Perhaps the most visible book to appear on the show, Meditations in an Emergency is also the title of Mad Men‘s second season finale. Way back in the first episode of that series, Don Draper meets a bohemian reading it in a bar where O’Hara happens to have composed much of the book who suggests that he’s too square to appreciate it. That, of course, is good enough to sell Don on the book. The New York School poet’s pieces, like the chaotic episode, are fraught with personal crisis. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Mad Men Season Two

The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    You want to know how good sex with Don Draper is? Well, when he’s in bed with Joy in Los Angeles, she’s reading The Sound and the Fury. When he asks her how she likes Faulkner’s masterpiece, she replies that it’s just OK compared to their roll in the hay. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Babylon Revisited and Other Stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    Seeing as Mad Men is, among other things, a mid-century update of The Great Gatsby, it makes sense that Fitzgerald would come into the series sooner or later. After Arthur, the cute stable boy, recommends that Betty read the novella “A Diamond as Big as the Ritz” back in season one, we find her with her nose stuck in the collection that includes it. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    Back in the early ’60s, it was Lawrence’s banned opus — not Twilight — that ladies passed around the office. In one of the show’s first few episodes, Joan returns the book to a friend, quipping, “It’s another testimony to how most people think that marriage is a joke.” Despite the office manager’s backhanded warnings, Peggy eagerly snatches up the book. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...

Exodus by Leon Uris

  • Cheltenham Township Library System
    Cheltenham Township Library System

    More research for Don: In an episode that finds him taking meetings with the Israeli Tourism Bureau and courting beguiling Jewess Rachel Menken, our hero turns to Uris’ novel about Israel’s founding to better understand both. Source: http://flavorwire.com/10633...