Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Do you have map lovers and mini-statisticians in your class? This is a book your shelves will want. There are six sections with information and maps that reflect that section. For example, the "history" section pairs well with many biographies and books that have a historical event at the center of the text to help students build background knowledge.

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babble.com

This book by Sandra Markle is another great example of high-interest informational text. Each page explores the "what if" with a different animal. The Vampire Bat and Shark were expected, but the Naked Mole Rat and Hippopotamus were a surprise. With this type of text, students naturally respond with informational text of their own creation. What if you had horse hooves? What if you had a cat's tail? What if you had a whale's blowhole? What if?

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ideasbyjivey.com

Kids love to chew, smack and pop gum so why not read about it? This nonfiction book appeals to a K-3 audience with the fascinating history of bubble gum.

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Choice Literacy

Franki Sibberson recommends Don't Lick the Dog as "a quick read, giving readers tips about how to behave around dogs. Each page shares a short tip on what to do when you see or approach a strange dog. It is filled with good information, and the illustrations make this a perfect primary read aloud."

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Choice Literacy

We've all heard them. "If you sit too close to the TV, you'll ruin your eyes" and "Cracking your knuckles will give you arthritis." It turns out that cracking knuckles won't give you arthritis, according to author Catherina Rondina, but it's "still not a handy exercise for your fingers." Literacy coach Samantha Munnecke recommends this book as a great source of short informational excerpts on high-interest parentisms.

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hongkiat.com

So if a black hole isn't a hole, what is it? Author Carolyn Cinami Decristafano answers this question for readers in this approachable and interesting book. Packed with labeled diagrams, amazing photographs and text boxes full of interesting facts, Black Hole is a feature feast. Literacy coach Samantha Munnecke recommends it for readers about age 12 and up.

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chicagonow.com

We treasure this book on many levels. Not only does it have the primary document language, it also provides a kid-friendly translation with vocabulary support for each amendment. There is a section about why kids should care about the Bill of Rights as well as a final chapter on the story behind it. Other books in this "What It Really Means" series include the I Have a Dream speech, the Pledge of Allegiance and more.

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amazon.com

Pairing direct quotes and speeches with a beautiful picture book, Martin's Big Words is a tribute to a celebrated American.

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thebubblyblondeteacher.blogspot.com

What's better than great nonfiction for kids written by a kid? Eleven-year-old Olivia Bouler began by saying, "I am willing to help." She used her knowledge and pictures of birds to help raise both money and awareness. You'll want a copy for your library.

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buzzfeed.com

As a 2013 Orbis Pictus Honor Book, this book not only emphasize the importance of scientists, but the idea that we all have the power to make our world a better place with every natural world interaction.

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readingyear.blogspot.com