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    Cincinnati History


    Cincinnati History

    • 130 Pins

    This week in 1998: 17.9 inches of snow. Photo: Matt Coleman of Covington, Ky., cleans snow off his truck after leaving his job at Cinergy in downtown Cincinnati Thursday Feb. 5, 1998. Coleman's truck was parked in a lot next to Cinergy Field. Enquirer file photo

    This week in 1998: 17.9 inches of snow

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    This Cincinnati woman reimagined the drug store. Photo: Cora Dow led the way for women in pharmacy as she built up the chain of Dow's Drugs stores. The Library of Congress/Bain Collection

    This Cincinnati woman reimagined the drug store

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    The Force was with Kenner’s ‘Star Wars’ toys. Photo: Shillito's ad for the Early Bird Certificate for the Kenner Star Wars figures, as appeared in the Cincinnati Enquirer on October 21, 1977. Enquirer file photo

    The Force was with Kenner’s ‘Star Wars’ toys

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    Remembering The Who concert tragedy. Photo: Flowers for a friend: Mary Beth Warmoth, sister of Jim Warmoth, of Franklin Township, Ohio, who died in the human stampede at Monday, Dec. 3 1979 before a rock concert by The Who. The Enquirer/Gordon Morioka

    Remembering The Who concert tragedy

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    Happy Anniversary, WKRP Cincinnati. Photo: NOVEMBER 1978: "WKRP in Cincinnati" stars Gary Sandy (left) and Gordon Jump get a first-hand look at Fountain Square's Tyler Davidson Fountain shown in the CBS sitcom's opening credits. Sandy (as program director Andy Travis) and Jump (as station manager Arthur the "Big Guy" Carlson) visited Cincinnati to promote the show in November 1978, two months after "WKRP" premiered. The Enquirer/Gerry Wolter

    Pinned from
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    Tycoon who donated 'Genius of Water' nearly lost it all. Photo: Architect William Tinsley located Oakwood, Henry Probasco’s Clifton mansion, on an east-west running ridge and faced it south toward the sun. An iron-gated fence on Lafayette Avenue opened to a road that led up to the mansion before the 29-acre estate was subdivided in the 20th century. The Enquirer/Gary Landers

    Tycoon who donated 'Genius of Water' nearly lost it all

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    Animals ruled the crowd at early Kings Island. Photo: August 1984: Endangered white rhinos from Africa at Kings Island's Wild Animal Habitat. Enquirer file photo

    Animals ruled the crowd at early Kings Island

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    Tragedy of Pike's Opera House recounted in new book. Photo: The second Pike’s Opera House, opened in 1868 on the site of the first incarnation on the south side of Fourth Street between Vine and Walnut, met the same fate as its predecessor – destroyed in a fire. Enquirer file photo

    Tragedy of Pike's Opera House recounted in new book

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    Cool Homes: Pitman House carvings bring outdoors in. Photo: The 130-year-old Pitman House’s tower features a widow’s walk. It is accessible today by climbing a built-in ladder that goes up through a narrow chute on the third floor. The Enquirer / Amanda Rossmann

    Cool Homes: Pitman House carvings bring outdoors in

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    Cool homes: Beer barons' brick beauty. Photo: The master bedroom on the third floor of Donna and Roger Weddle's home. The Weddles live on the top floor, of the Wiedemann Mansion, which is formerly the ballroom. The Wiedemann Mansion, a 1894 Samuel Hannaford & Sons designed mansion was the home of Charles Wiedemann, whose father George founded what was once the largest brewery in Kentucky. The first two floors of the home can be rented out for special events. The Enquirer/ Amanda Rossmann

    Cool homes: Beer barons' brick beauty

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    Cool Homes: Herschede Mansion offers trip back in time. Photo: Hall clock maker and jeweler Frank Herschede hired Cincinnati architect Samuel S. Godley to build a family home for his wife, Sadie, and their eight children. The Herschede mansion at 3886 Reading Road in Avondale is much as it was in 1908 when the family moved in. The Enquirer/Amanda Rossman

    Cool Homes: Herschede Mansion offers trip back in time

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    Cool Homes: Tudor's rathskeller mural sets a sunny mood. Photo: Kroger vice president Joseph Bappert and his family were the first occupants of this stately Tudor revival home erected in 1936 in Green Township. Its elaborate basement mural was added in 1943 by Cincinnati artist Mathias Noheimer. The Enquirer/Joseph Fuqua II

    Cool Homes: Tudor's rathskeller mural sets a sunny mood

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    Cool Homes: Probasco mansion in Clifton fit for royalty. Photo: Architect William Tinsley located Oakwood, Henry Probasco’s Clifton mansion, on an east-west running ridge and faced it south toward the sun. An iron-gated fence on Lafayette Avenue opened to a road that led up to the mansion before the 29-acre estate was subdivided in the 20th century. The Enquirer/Gary Landers

    Cool Homes: Probasco mansion in Clifton fit for royalty

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    Harrison's presidential campaign changed politics. Photo: The tomb of President William Henry Harrison stands guard over North Bend Ohio. The Enquirer/Malinda Hurting

    Harrison's presidential campaign changed politics

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    Lazarus to thank for Thanksgiving date. Photo: Fred Lazarus Jr. Enquirer archive photo

    Lazarus to thank for Thanksgiving date

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    Did Annie Oakley shooting contest happen in Cincinnati? Photo: A sign in North Fairmount marks the site of the legendary shooting contest between Annie Oakley and Frank Butler. The Enquirer/Jeff Suess

    Did Annie Oakley shooting contest happen in Cincinnati?

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    River towns celebrate milestones: New Richmond 200, Ludlow 150. Photo: New Richmond's Front Street along the waterfront in 1953. Today, the first building on the right is Front Street Cafe. The historic Springer House is third from right. Enquirer archive photo

    River towns celebrate milestones: New Richmond 200, Ludlow 150

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    Cemeteries mark city's Jewish history. Photo: Chestnut Street Cemetery, also known as Old Jewish Cemetery, the oldest Jewish cemetery west of the Allegheny Mountains, in the Betts-Longworth Historic District in the West End, at Chestnut Street and Central Avenue. It was open from 1821 to 1849. The cemetery is owned by Jewish Cemeteries of Greater Cincinnati. The Enquirer/Jeff Suess

    Cemeteries mark city's Jewish history

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    Renovated Rankin House tells story of slaves running to freedom. Photo: The Rankin House has undergone a complete restoration, including a new roof, shutters, painted to the original brownish red, and the elimination of a period-inaccurate portico over the front door. The Enquirer/Jeff Suess

    Renovated Rankin House tells story of slaves running to freedom

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    Covenant-First Presbyterian traces back to Cincinnati's beginning. Photo: Covenant-First Presbyterian Church at Eighth and Elm streets has stood for 140 years, and houses links to Cincinnati’s history. The Enquirer/Michael Snyder

    Covenant-First Presbyterian traces back to Cincinnati's beginning

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    150 years ago, Lincoln was shot and The Enquirer missed it. Photo: Ulysses S. Grant. Enquirer file photo

    150 years ago, Lincoln was shot and The Enquirer missed it

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    Impact of World War I felt around Cincinnati. Photo: An officer pauses by the grave of Lt. Robert E. Bentley of Cincinnati, killed in action at Cierges, France, on Sept. 28, 1918. Enquirer archive photo

    Impact of World War I felt around Cincinnati

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    Ads for fake Plummet Mall stirred controversy, laughter. Photo: 1985: Jay Gilbert of Jay Gilbert Productions, song and jingle writer. The Enquirer/Fred Straub

    Ads for fake Plummet Mall stirred controversy, laughter

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    Building enables YWCA to empower women. Photo: The lobby of the YWCA Building features art deco styling, from the marble staircase to the original brass elevator doors that have been adapted as a display on the right. Enquirer file photo

    Building enables YWCA to empower women

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    'Never built' Temple Tower skyscraper could have been a companion to Carew Tower. Photo: Samuel Hannaford & Sons sketch of Temple Tower, a proposed skyscraper to replace the First Presbyterian Church on Fourth Street that was never built. Enquirer file photo

    'Never built' Temple Tower skyscraper could have been a companion to Carew Tower

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