There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
He used Pinterest to explore new campsites
Join Pinterest to find (and save!) all the things that inspire you.
Creating an account means you’re okay with Pinterest's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
50+
billion Pins
to explore
15
seconds to
sign up (free!)

Medieval Times


Back to
Medieval Times

Medieval Times

  • 243 Pins

Edward 'The Elder' (r. 899-924) The Anglo-Saxon kings Well-trained by Alfred, his son Edward 'the Elder' (reigned 899-924) was a bold soldier who defeated the Danes in Northumbria at Tettenhall in 910 and was acknowledged by the Viking kingdom of York. The kings of Strathclyde and the Scots submitted to Edward in 921. By military success and patient planning, Edward spread English influence and control.

Pinned from
royal.gov.uk

The tomb effigy, of King Edward III, at Westminster Abbey. Edward III was 14 when he was crowned King and assumed government in his own right in 1330.

Pinned from
awesomestories.com

Illumination from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

Pinned from
archive.org

Arundel Castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England is a restored medieval castle. It was founded by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror.

savannahlondon

persephonesbox.com

Brass rubbing 1361 or 1392, of Eleynore Corp. From Devon, England.

Pinned from
cottesimple.com

The working library of Hereford Cathedral in England originated in the eleventh century. The chained library at the cathedral, containing 229 medieval manuscripts, remains the largest historic chained library in the world, with all its rods, chains and locks intact. It has been preserved in the form in which it was maintained from 1611 to 1841.

Pinned from
mediumaevum.modhist.ox.ac.uk
  • Marsea
    Marsea

    I've been to this fascinating library.

Only known/confirmed contemporary depiction of Joan of Arc is this sketch.

Pinned from
saint-joan-of-arc.com

Amazing ancient Viking spear-head! Dates from the 4th - 8th century AD.

Pinned from
ancientresource.com

Old English: including The Lord's Prayer in West Saxon, and pronunciation info

Pinned from
nethelper.com

Isabella of Angouleme, renowned beauty. King John, youngest son of Queen Eleanor of Aquitane, was in lust with her from the first time he saw her at 13. She was betrothed to a De Lusignan, but he married her on the sly. His subjects did not approve of his mad passion for her, but he ignored them and openly spent a lot of time in bed with her, which caused much scandal.

Pinned from
sophieperinot.com

1250 Original Medieval Vellum Bible Leaf Latin Old Testament Samuel II Israel eBay

Pinned from
r.ebay.com

Joan of Kent, first Princess of Wales (1328-1385) was the wife of Edward the Black Prince. Their marriage was a love match; the Plantagenet sons of Edward III had a tendency to defy convention & follow their heart. While Edward & Joan never became King & Queen of England, their surviving son became Richard II. Edward treated his wife affectionately in public & in private; his letter to her seven years after their wedding began, "My dearest and truest sweetheart and beloved companion."

Pinned from
genealogy.theroyfamily.com

Former place of the Shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral. The martyrdom of Becket occurred on 29 December 1170. The shrine was destroyed in 1538 under orders of Henry VIII.

Pinned from
tudorhistory.org

Adeliza of Louvain, sometimes known in England as Adelicia of Louvain, also called Adela and Aleidis; (1103 – 23 April 1151) was queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of Henry I.

Pinned from
amazon.com

King John (1199-1216). 21st great-grandfather to Queen Eliz II. House of Angevin. Reign: 17 yrs, 6 mos, 13 days. Successor: son, Henry III. The legend of Robin Hood dates from this time in which John is portrayed as Bad King John. He was involved in intrigues against his absent brother, but became king in 1199 when Richard was killed in battle in France. Set repressive policies and taxes to fund war in France. The first written constitution, The Magna Carta, was signed during King John's reign.

Pinned from
britroyals.com

Remains of an Anglo Saxon warrior, buried with his spear and a bronze-bound drinking cup, after he was was discovered by modern soldiers on a rehabilitation programme. Photograph: Ministry of Defence An excavation on Salisbury plain has proved an unusually emotional experience for the volunteer archaeologists, as soldiers recovering from injuries received in Afghanistan have made a surprise discovery: the remains of warriors who died more than 1,400 years ago.

Pinned from
guardian.co.uk

King Edward III (1327-1377). House of Plantagenet. 17th great-grandfather of QEII. Reign: 50 yrs, 4 mos, 25 days. Succeeded by grandson, Richard II. In 1330 he had his mother, Isabella imprisoned for life. 1337 began the 100 Years' War with France. Created the Order of the Garter in 1344. In 1350 bubonic plague kills 1/3 of England's population. Improved the monarchy after his father's chaotic reign. Edward III died of a stroke at 64 years old.

Pinned from
britroyals.com

King Edward II (1307-1327). 18th great-grandfather of Queen Eliz II. House of Plantagenet. Reign: 20 yrs, 2 mos., 14 days. Successor: son, Edward III. He was appointed the 1st Prince of Wales by his father, King Edward I Longshanks. Considered incompetent, frivolous and unduly influenced by his "favourites", he was deposed by his wife Isabella & her lover Roger de Mortimer, and murdered in Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire.

Pinned from
britroyals.com

Circa 1500-Silver Collar Excerpt: Livery collars composed of S-shaped links became popular at the English court after their introduction by John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (1340-1399). They ranged from the jewelled gold collars sported by royalty and the nobility to the ribbon or leather collars with silver or copper letters attached that were worn by lesser officials. Pendants could be hung from the chain as symbols of office or to indicate allegiance to a particular group.

Pinned from
collections.vam.ac.uk

James I (1394 - 1437). King from 1406 to his death in 1437. He was captured by pirates and given to the English in 1406. He was imprisoned for the next 18 years but given an education. In 1424 he and his wife were allowed to leave England. He was unpopular in Scotland, and was murdered in 1437 by his uncle. He married Joan Beaufort and several children.

Pinned from
en.wikipedia.org

Imperial Orb, Sword and Scabbard of the Holy Roman Empire. The orb was made in Germany c.1200, the scabbard in Italy in the 2nd half of the 11th century, and the sword in Germany c.1198-1218. The gold panels on the scabbard depict kings and emperors from Charlemagne to Henry III.

Pinned from
coeurdelhistoire.tumblr.com

Æthelwulf Ring, (Laverstock: Found in a cart rut.) ca. 828-858, Late Anglo-Saxon. The British Museum.

Pinned from
galava.tumblr.com

The Coronation Spoon is over 800 years old. It was sold, rather than being destroyed with the rest of the medieval crown jewels, and survived Cromwell's Commonwealth. It is used for holy oil at coronations.

Pinned from
hrp.org.uk

Joan of Navarre (c. 1370 – 10 June 1437) was a Duchess consort of Brittany and a Queen consort of England. She was the regent of Brittany from 1399 until 1403 during the minority of her son. She was a daughter of King Charles II of Navarre and Joan of France.[1] Her maternal grandparents were John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg. Through marriage she was the Duchess consort of Brittany and later the Queen consort of England when she wed King Henry IV of England.

Pinned from
en.wikipedia.org

Berengaria of Navarre c. 1165–1170 – 23 December 1230) was Queen of the English as the wife of King Richard I of England. She was the eldest daughter of King Sancho VI of Navarre and Sancha of Castile. As is the case with many of the medieval queens consort of the Kingdom of England, relatively little is known of her life. The early 20th Century Cunard passenger liner RMS Berengaria was named in her honour, the first Cunard ship to be named for a British queen.

Pinned from
en.wikipedia.org