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"If you hear the dogs, keep going. If you see the torches in the woods, keep going. If there’s shouting after you, keep going. Don’t ever stop. Keep going. If you want a taste of freedom, keep going." - Harriet Tubman.    [Applies to many situations...]

"If you hear the dogs, keep going. If you see the torches in the woods, keep going. If there’s shouting after you, keep going. Don’t ever stop. Keep going. If you want a taste of freedom, keep going." - Harriet Tubman. [Applies to many situations...]

1860 -1900 (17)..A beautiful image of a one room colored school in Fruit Cove, FL....SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH,  sometime  between mid to late 1870s-1880s

1860 -1900 (17)..A beautiful image of a one room colored school in Fruit Cove, FL....SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, sometime between mid to late 1870s-1880s

Historic Photographs Of White Slaves

Community Post: Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

Harriet Tubman with slaves she helped rescue during the American Civil War, ca. 1885. Left to right: Harriet Tubman; Gertie Davis {Watson} (adopted daughter of Tubman} behind Tubman; Nelson Davis (husband and 8th USCT veteran); Lee Cheney (great-great-niece); “Pop” {John} Alexander; Walter Green; Blind “Aunty” Sarah Parker; Dora Stewart (great-niece and granddaughter of Tubman’s brother Robert Ross aka John Stewart).

Harriet Tubman with slaves she helped rescue during the American Civil War, ca. 1885. Left to right: Harriet Tubman; Gertie Davis {Watson} (adopted daughter of Tubman} behind Tubman; Nelson Davis (husband and 8th USCT veteran); Lee Cheney (great-great-niece); “Pop” {John} Alexander; Walter Green; Blind “Aunty” Sarah Parker; Dora Stewart (great-niece and granddaughter of Tubman’s brother Robert Ross aka John Stewart).

Intersting.The first known African American to publish literature, he was a lifelong slave of the Lloyd family on Long Island. He was a servant who was a clerk in the family business, a farmhand, and an artisan. He was allowed to attend school and was a devout Christian, as were the Lloyds. His first published poem was written on Christmas Day, 1760.

Intersting.The first known African American to publish literature, he was a lifelong slave of the Lloyd family on Long Island. He was a servant who was a clerk in the family business, a farmhand, and an artisan. He was allowed to attend school and was a devout Christian, as were the Lloyds. His first published poem was written on Christmas Day, 1760.

Yess...they get mad as hell when one of our people do something talk about a bunch of mentally deranged folk.

SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1860 -1900 (11)    Pickin' cotton in Georgia.

SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1860 -1900 (11) Pickin' cotton in Georgia.

The Face of Slavery   Other African American Photographs -- American Museum of Photography

The Face of Slavery Other African American Photographs -- American Museum of Photography

WOW.  A little piece of history.  It is really hard to believe this is what used to be.  So sad!

A little piece of history. Hard to believe it used to be like that.

WOW. A little piece of history. It is really hard to believe this is what used to be. So sad!

Daguerreotype of Georgina Holmes and Her Nurse. The family, originally from Louisiana, moved their household to New York City whereupon the slaves were released. The nurse depicted in this daguerreotype chose not to leave the household.

Daguerreotype of Georgina Holmes and Her Nurse. The family, originally from Louisiana, moved their household to New York City whereupon the slaves were released. The nurse depicted in this daguerreotype chose not to leave the household.

SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1860 -1900 (2) -- And one WHITE KID with Back to the Camera by Okinawa Soba, via Flickr

SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1860 -1900 (2) -- And one WHITE KID with Back to the Camera by Okinawa Soba, via Flickr