Interesting Industry Stats


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Interesting Industry Stats

Interesting Industry Stats

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Check out the infographic below to see how social media strategies have had real world impact for small businesses and even the presidential election.

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#Infographic: Ad Retargeting Statistics: Audience vs. Marketers Perspective - #marketing #advertising

17 Incredible Retargeting Ad Stats - Infographic

digitalinformationworld.com

3 S’s of Successful Content Marketing.

Social Media e Innovación Tecnológica

scoop.it

Advertising Psychology

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An infographic from Global Visas showing patterns in studying abroad, increases in numbers, and why people choose to study in another country.

Studying Abroad: Where Students Go and Why | Visual.ly

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Social Influence

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socialmediatoday.com

Pinterest e intenção de compra

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QR code inforgraphic

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can facebook ads ever beat google?

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wordstream.com

The Anatomy of Going Viral

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singlegrain.com

Three Generations

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10 Ways to Increase Sales

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The Players Now that we understand what's being traded, let's take a brief look at the major players in the value chain, and then I'll let you get back to whatever it was you were doing before you started reading this post. The Publisher We've already covered this guy. He's the one with the site, or the game, or the mobile portal, who is creating ad inventory and wants to sell it to advertisers to provide income for his business. Publishers are interested in maximizing revenues, but also at minimizing risk - they hate to have unsold inventory (that is, ad space with no ads in it) so they employ a number of tactics to ensure that at least something gets shown in an ad unit that they can get a little money for. Larger publishers have their own sales teams who maintain direct relationships with advertisers and their agencies, cutting deals for big blocks of advertising inventory over expensive lunches in chic Greenwich Village restaurants. But this model only works for big publishers selling to big advertisers. Small publishers can't afford to maintain their own sales force, and even if they did, they'd never get through the doors of Ford, or CapitalOne, because they don't have enough inventory to be of interest on their own account. So these guys sell their ad inventory through Ad Networks. One other kind of publisher it's worth calling out here is the search engine - i.e. Google, Yahoo and Microsoft. These search engines are the creators of huge amounts of ad inventory that is sold directly to advertisers and agencies, as well as running significant ad networks (see below). The Ad Network Ad Networks are essentially outsourced sales houses for publisher inventory. An ad network strikes deals with lots of publishers for their inventory and then aggregates this inventory and sells it on to advertisers and agencies. There are over 300 ad networks in existence today - a breathtakingly large number which is sure to fall soon. An ad network's value proposition to publishers is that it can sell inventory that the publisher can't sell itself - either because the publisher is small (and so doesn't have its own sales force), or, in the case of larger publishers, the inventory is of too low-value to merit direct selling. This kind of inventory is called remnant inventory. The network's value to an advertiser is that the advertiser can appear on lots of sites across the Internet (potentially thousands) without having to establish direct relationships with those publishers individually. At bottom, the Ad Network business model is to buy inventory cheaply and sell it on at a higher price. There are a variety of ways of doing this, some of which I've covered before. One of the most promising is to add value to the ad inventory by adding targeting data (so that the impression can be sold for a higher price). I'll cover this in a future installment. Networks come in all shapes and sizes. There are 'premium' networks which work with remnant inventory for large publishers; there are vertical networks which focus on a particular industry or technology (such as video); and, at the bottom end, there are contextual networks which provide an auction-based marketplace for selling keyword-based ads on small sites. You may have heard of the #1 network in this space - it's called Google AdSense. The Advertiser Advertisers also come in all shapes and sizes, of course. The big name advertisers - the folk we've all heard of - will have significant internal marketing departments, and will also likely retain the services of an agency to help them manage their marketing. Their marketing objectives will likely be a mix of brand marketing (raising general awareness) and direct response marketing (getting someone to actually buy something online now). Smaller online advertisers are almost always focused on direct-response - getting someone to click and buy, or possibly call up. By and large, these folk can't afford to retain an agency to do their marketing for them, so they tend to go straight to certain ad networks or publishers to buy their ads. Again, the #1 in this space is our friend Google, with AdWords (the advertiser-facing side of the AdSense network). Advertisers are motivated by getting the best ROI on their ad investment; but amongst larger advertisers some other curious motivations creep in, like wanting to make sure that a committed ad budget for a quarter actually gets spent (so that budget isn't cut the following quarter). This drives the behavior of ad agencies, to an extent. The Agency Last but by no means least, the media agency is an essential intermediary in the advertising value chain. Ad agencies usually do one of two things (or both, such as is the case with our own Avenue A|Razorfish): they create ads (anything from designing an animated banner to filming a 30-second TV ad) - known as the creative business - and they buy the media (i.e. the ad inventory) to display the ads (known as the media business). Whilst the creative side is cooler, the part of ad agencies that is relevant here is the media business. A media agency, then, is one that buys media on behalf of its advertiser client. The advertiser typically says "I have x million dollars this quarter for online, and this campaign I want to run. Buy me the best media to reach my target audience". It's then the media agency's job to plan a media buy that will deliver the best return for the advertiser. At the small-business end of the spectrum, the 'media agency' morphs into small SEM (Search Engine Marketing) shops who are good at buying Google AdWords, and maybe have some SEO (Search Engine Optimization) skills to boot to boost a company's natural search rankings. Media agencies' motivation is driven by getting as much media under their control as possible, since they're paid (particularly at the high-end) with a cut (usually something like 15%) of the advertiser's media budget. They also don't want to under-spend on the budget they've been given, as this can annoy their client (see above). Media buying is a manual, labor-intensive process right now, and one I'll come back to. Improvements to technology will mean that agencies (especially larger ones) will have to do some pretty fancy footwork to continue to add value for their advertiser clients.

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The advertising industry, in snakes and ladders

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Professions at the Intersection of Technology, Marketing & Statistics.

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social media jobs salary guide, a look at the top 20 u.s. markets: sharing as a career in the field of social media #jobmarket #stats #socialmedia

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social media stats

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social media stats

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visual.ly

The History of Marketing

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Google+ Killer Facts and Statistics

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Latest Twitter statistics

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app store statistics

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Internet Statistics 2011

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Social media statistics

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Videogame statistics

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