Green earthenware pitcher made by M. L. Owens, North Carolina

Potters For The North Carolina Pottery Center: North Carolina Art Pottery Pitchers.Owens, Seagrove, N.

Ice-water pitcher with lid, Seagrove Pottery "Crystal Blue" glaze, made and glazed by Walter Auman and marked with the date "1976." Walter formulated Crystal Blue in the early 1970s, following the first imposition of Federal restrictions on lead-glazed pottery. The result was a soft, semi-matte finish, lighter in tone than the lead-rutile matte blue previously used by Seagrove Pottery and C. C. Cole Pottery.

Potters For The North Carolina Pottery Center: North Carolina Art Pottery Pitchers

Four pitchers by Phil Graves of J. B. Cole Pottery. The two in front are from the 1930s, made with Michfield light clay; the two in back are post-WWII, made with Smithfield redware clay.

Potters For The North Carolina Pottery Center: North Carolina Art Pottery Pitchers

Rebecca Jug (also known as the Rebecca Pitcher). This example by Joe Owen illustrates the essential elements: rounded on the lower body, necked in above, a widened rim shaped to form a spout, & an added handle.

The Rebecca Jug is also known as the Rebecca Pitcher. This example by Joe Owen illustrates the essential elements of the pitcher -- rounded on the lower body, necked in above, a widened rim shaped to form a spout, and an added handle

Two views of a vintage polychrome-glazed pitcher by Thurston Cole, C. C. Cole Pottery. The colored lead glazes in this piece have run and blended to give a unique result to the finished piece. C. C. Cole Pottery workers applied a whitish body glaze, then dribbled bands of color around the body, and finally dipped the top of the piece in another colored glaze.

Potters For The North Carolina Pottery Center: North Carolina Art Pottery Pitchers

Salt-glazed ware came to dominate the pottery trade during the 19th century.  These examples are modern interpretations made by David Farrell of Westmoore Pottery. Salt-glazed ware was often fired green and plain, & any embellishment that might occur was a result of the effects of the wood fire and the occasional kiln drip. Sometimes potters would decorate their pitchers and other utilitarian items with designs in cobalt oxide brushed on before firing. Cobalt oxide retains its blue color at…

Potters For The North Carolina Pottery Center: North Carolina Art Pottery Pitchers

Pressed glass milk pitcher, circa 1880s.

Pressed glass milk pitcher, circa 1880s.

The genuine article! A redware pitcher "slicked" with a clear lead-fluxed glaze. This example, with an ice lip, was found in North Carolina, maker unknown. It displays a simple elegance of form and function. Colors in the glaze are from impurities in the clay, rather than deliberate decoration.

Potters For The North Carolina Pottery Center: North Carolina Art Pottery Pitchers

Pinterest
Search