There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
They used Pinterest to find new places to visit
Join Pinterest to find all the things that inspire you.
Creating an account means you’re okay with Pinterest's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
50+
billion Pins
to explore
15
seconds to
sign up (free!)

Tears


Back to
Tears

Tears

  • 67 Pins

Words carved into the cell wall of a Jewish prisoner during the Holocaust…

You may not be pushing me away but youre not fighting to keep me either...

The last words of inmates at the death camp at Stutthof are carved into these walls. Photo credit: Meczenstwo Walka, Zaglada Zydów Polsce 1939-1945. Poland. No. 312

Three men who stood in the same line in Auschwitz have nearly consecutive numbers: From left, Menachem Shulovitz, 80, bears B14594; Anshel Udd Sharezky, 81, was B14595; and Jacob Zabetzky, 83, was B14597. “We were strangers standing in line in Auschwitz, we all survived different paths of hell, and we met in Israel,” Mr. Sharezky said. We stand here together now after 65 years. Do you realize the magnitude of the miracle?”

Log In - The New York Times

nytimes.com

Known as the Tower of Faces this three-story tower displays photographs from the Yaffa Eliach Shtetl Collection. Taken between 1890 and 1941 in Eishishok, a small town in what is now Lithuania, they describe a vibrant Jewish community that existed for 900 years. In 1941, an SS mobile killing squad entered the village and within two days massacred the entire Jewish population.

Auschwitz

Auschwitz concentration camp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org

One of the most famous photos taken during the Holocaust shows Jewish families arrested by Nazis during the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto in Poland, and sent to be gassed at Treblinka extermination camp. This picture and over 50 others were taken by the Nazis to chronicle the successful destruction of the Ghetto.

Children's shoes from Auschwitz .

#rugrats *cries*

Berlin, Germany. Plates outside of homes say the names of the Jewish families that lived there and at which camp they died.

Read about slave badges used during American Slavery.

History, Travel, Arts, Science, People, Places | Smithsonian

smithsonianmag.com

"I got this Tattoo after my twin brother died. He committed suicide after three tours in the Middle East with the US Army. I had his name badge tattooed right where I put my hand over my heart for the Pledge of Allegiance. Every pledge is a tribute to his service and sacrifice." AMAZING

The Premonition by Michael Vincent Manalo

" SANCTUARY " Henry Asencio

Creative Mind | Facebook

facebook.com

Statue of the Slavery monument in Zanzibar Stone Town, Tanzania

Lee Miller sneaks a bath in Hitler’s apartment after the fall of Berlin, 1945. She later explained blithely, “I had his address in my pocket for years.” [Photo by David E. Scherman; source NYT] “She got Scherman to photograph her, unclothed, in Hitler’s bath,” writes Lucy Davies in The Telegraph. “Her boots are placed in the foreground, covered in the dust of Dachau, which she had visited the day before. The juxtaposition belonged to that Surrealist universe in which dream and coincidence rei...

When Victorian actresss Fanny Kemble moved to America to marry the slave plantation owner Pierce Mease Butler, she was horrified by the conditions she found there – though her husband barred her from publishing her thoughts. After a messy divorce, she published a journal of her time on the plantation which shocked America, and became a prominent anti-slavery campaigner.

ARNOLD GENTHE. The San Francisco Fire, 1906. Great photograph.

"Auschwitz-Birkenau, then and now" (via BBC) The juxtaposition of images is chilling

pinner writes: Hugh O’Flaherty was an Irish Catholic priest who saved about 4,000 Allied soldiers and Jews in Rome during World War II. O’Flaherty used his status as a priest and his protection by the Vatican to conceal 4000 escapees – Allied soldiers and Jews – in flats, farms and convents. Despite the Nazis desperately wanting to stop his actions, his protection by the Vatican prevented them officially arresting him. He saved the majority of Jews in Rome.

Soon after liberation, surviving children of the Auschwitz camp walk out of the children's barracks. Poland, after January 27, 1945. — US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Kazimierz Piechowski is one of just 144 prisoners to have broken out of the notorious Nazi camp, Auschwitz, and survive. Piechowski spent time in Ukraine before he returned to Poland, joining the partisan Polish Home Army and spending the rest of the war fighting the Nazis. Incredible story.

history

Exterior view of Price, Birch & Co. slave pen at Alexandria, Virginia, circa 1865

Three men who stood in the same line in Auschwitz have nearly consecutive numbers: From left, Menachem Shulovitz, 80, bears B14594; Anshel Udd Sharezky, 81, was B14595; and Jacob Zabetzky, 83, was B14597. “We were strangers standing in line in Auschwitz, we all survived different paths of hell, and we met in Israel,” Mr. Sharezky said. "We stand here together now after 65 years. Do you realize the magnitude of the miracle?”