8 ways to decorate with maps and globes

8 Ways to Decorate with Maps & Globes

Daffodils + Coconut Cake + our Easter Village = A beautiful Easter buffet!

Daffodils + Coconut Cake + our Easter Village = A beautiful Easter buffet!

Benjamin Moore Windham Cream, a sunlit, luscious cream with a whispery undertone of pale butter, works well with other colors, brightens hallways that have little natural light

HC-6 Windham Cream

Benjamin Moore Windham Cream, a sunlit, luscious cream with a whispery undertone of pale butter, works well with other colors, brightens hallways that have little natural light

BENJAMIN MOORE GRANT BEIGE HC-83: "My standby is Grant Beige. It's like a favorite pair of worn khakis. It works with modern spaces and traditional ones, fares equally well with the light of Texas or the East Coast. If you want to keep your palette clean with whites, creams, and accents of black, it becomes very architectural, or you can warm it up with soft reds, blues, and greens." -Christopher Ridolfi

Colors in Neutral

BENJAMIN MOORE GRANT BEIGE HC-83: "My standby is Grant Beige. It's like a favorite pair of worn khakis. It works with modern spaces and traditional ones, fares equally well with the light of Texas or the East Coast. If you want to keep your palette clean with whites, creams, and accents of black, it becomes very architectural, or you can warm it up with soft reds, blues, and greens." -Christopher Ridolfi

Tim Clarke's Favorite Colors Oratt Lambert Rubidoux

Designers' Favorite Coastal Paint Colors

Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.

Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.

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