What The Fire Said

This board combines paintings from several albums featured on my own art website What The Fire Said, most of them in some way connected to the worlds of myth and Antiquity. If to us our distant past is in the realm of myth, perhaps it is we who are the myths of a distant and unimaginable future.
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What The Fire Said: The Phantom of the Opera. The despair of love that not only is unrequited, but always will remain so. In the fairy story, it is Beauty who redeems the Beast through her unconditional love. But the profound horror in Gaston Leroux's story stems from the fact that there is no redemption.

The despair of love that not only is unrequited, but always will remain so. In the fairy story, it is Beauty who redeems the Beast t.

What The Fire Said: The Four Elements: Symbols

The Four Elements symbols ©David-Bergen-Studio

What The Fire Said: The Gospel of Mary. Who was Mary Magdalene? Thanks to a misguided assumption about a passage in Luke's gospel by Pope Gregory I in the 6th-century, the erroneous tradition that Mary was a redeemed whore has persisted for fourteen long centuries. But the text of the Gospel of Mary, written three centuries earlier, reveals a very different Mary Magdalene.

Who was Mary Magdalene? Thanks to a misguided assumption about a passage in Luke's gospel by Pope Gregory I in the the .

What The Fire Said: Sappho. Plato called her the Tenth Muse, and she was widely regarded as the greatest poet of her age, initiating a wholly original poetic style of personal reflection which we now take for granted, but that in an age of recited epic verse was unique for her time.

Plato called her the Tenth Muse, and she was widely regarded as the greatest poet of her age, initiating a wholly original poetic st.

What The Fire Said: The Guardian

We might in some distant age meet at last those who watch over us, who in silence attend faithfully to our earthly welfare.

What The Fire Said: New Rituals for a New World

We think of myths as belonging to a distant past, but the far future can provide its own fertile ground for the world of myth.

What The Fire Said: The Alchemist

What The Fire Said: The Alchemist

What The Fire Said: The Solace of Dreams

In an unimaginably distant future we will surely still dream, and our dreams will be both our desires and our experiences of that wo.

What The Fire Said: Princess Andromeda. Depictions of Andromeda being rescued from the sea monster by the hero Perseus typically portray her as a Grecian-style princess. But where did Andromeda really come from?

This is my second version of this subject, and the one which I personally prefer. When I first came to tackle the subject I had the .

What The Fire Said: The Word

Let there be an opening into the quiet that lies beneath the chaos, Where you find the peace you did not think possible and see what shimmers within the storm ~Jan Richardson

What The Fire Said: The Book of Revelation

A writer whom we know as John of Patmos, called John the Divine, wrote descriptions of a series of his remarkable visions that were .

What The Fire Said: And Ye shall be as Gods

"And ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil." Genesis The promise made by the serpent to Eve as a way of persuading her to .

What The Fire Said: A Growth of Crystals. Sometimes we just need to slow things right down and be patient. It is patience that will allow crystals to form and grow. Nature has all the time in the world, and even when very little seems to be happening, from deep within the great stillness new forms emerge.

Sometimes we just need to slow things right down and be patient. It is patience that will allow crystals to form and grow.

What The Fire Said: Mary of Egypt. Having run away from home at age twelve, Mary lived a dissolute life in Alexandria for the next 17 years. She  journeyed to Jerusalem, where a conversion experience led her to cross the Jordan and live a life in the unforgiving wilderness of the Jordanian desert as a reclusive naked penitent, not for months, nor even for years, but for almost five decades. At the end of her life she was discovered by chance by the monk Zosimas, to whom she told her story.

Having run away from home at the tender age of twelve, Mary lived a dissolute life in the city of Alexandria for the next seventeen .

What The Fire Said: Lucy Westenra. Where lies the true horror? In the Bram Stoker’s Dracula we tend to think of the horror of blood and vampire fangs. Such things are the thrill of 19th-century melodrama, but what makes such gothic classics endure is the way in which they tug us towards deeper truths. Lucy, the victim of Dracula, becomes a sad walking puppet, neither living nor truly dead. It is the horror of possession, of desiring total mastery over another, which is the true horror.

Where lies the true horror? In the story of Bram Stoker’s Dracula we tend to think of the horror of blood and vampire fangs.

What The Fire Said: Sister Bertken. Why would a woman allow herself to voluntarily be walled up in a small cell with no way out, not for a fixed period of time, but for the rest of her life? In the 15th-century Sister Bertken of Utrecht did exactly this, and her story confronts us both with our own reactions to her extraordinary decision and ultimately with what faith actually is.

Why would a woman allow herself to voluntarily be walled up in a small cell with no way out, not for a fixed period of time, but for.

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