2014 Young Masters Exhibition, Dallas Museum of Art

Selected original works created by Advanced Placement® Studio Art, Art History, and Music Theory students participating in the O’Donnell Foundation’s AP Fine Arts Incentive Program™
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Avery Storms, Booker T. Washington HSPVA, "The Zookeeper’s Son": “My work deconstructs personal struggles into narratively inclined abstraction. Traces of surreal stories and timeless qualities cause the viewer to create their own storylines. I texture compositions with complex designs and create levels of detail for the viewer to explore. Ultimately, I hope to create emotional realms unlike any other kind of artwork.”

Avery Storms, Booker T. Washington HSPVA, "The Zookeeper’s Son": “My work deconstructs personal struggles into narratively inclined abstraction. Traces of surreal stories and timeless qualities cause the viewer to create their own storylines. I texture compositions with complex designs and create levels of detail for the viewer to explore. Ultimately, I hope to create emotional realms unlike any other kind of artwork.”

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Sophia Prijic, Booker T. Washington HSPVA, "To Be a Doll":   “I wanted to capture the common obsession for perfection by teenage girls and women. I used high contrast to whiten out blemishes, giving the face a porcelain look. The mannequin’s arm further gives the illusion of a human doll. The model caresses the arm against her face showing her infatuation and corrupt mind. The unfocused dolls in the background help the model blend in as a fake but perfect human.”

Sophia Prijic, Booker T. Washington HSPVA, "To Be a Doll": “I wanted to capture the common obsession for perfection by teenage girls and women. I used high contrast to whiten out blemishes, giving the face a porcelain look. The mannequin’s arm further gives the illusion of a human doll. The model caresses the arm against her face showing her infatuation and corrupt mind. The unfocused dolls in the background help the model blend in as a fake but perfect human.”

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Micah Secor, Plano West Senior High School, "Hanging":  “The work plays with the traditional concept of a portrait by diverging from the typical subject and media. Portrait subjects are made to be appealing to the eye, but I drew the model contorting her face upside down. The charcoal hair is shaped and given highlights to mimic hanging, and the altered background of downward coffee drips creates a continuous direction throughout the piece.”

Micah Secor, Plano West Senior High School, "Hanging": “The work plays with the traditional concept of a portrait by diverging from the typical subject and media. Portrait subjects are made to be appealing to the eye, but I drew the model contorting her face upside down. The charcoal hair is shaped and given highlights to mimic hanging, and the altered background of downward coffee drips creates a continuous direction throughout the piece.”

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Kristen Rundstein, Richardson High School, "Round Stone":  “Rundstein, my last name, is the Yiddish word for round stone. Inspired by its meaning, I formed three ceramic donuts on the pottery wheel and threw a base for the three donuts to rest upon. Smaller clay adornments were added to improve the flow of the piece.”

Kristen Rundstein, Richardson High School, "Round Stone": “Rundstein, my last name, is the Yiddish word for round stone. Inspired by its meaning, I formed three ceramic donuts on the pottery wheel and threw a base for the three donuts to rest upon. Smaller clay adornments were added to improve the flow of the piece.”

Nicole Schifferdecker, Newman Smith High School, "Carrot Garden":   “In this piece, I created a bizarre twist on a classic self-portrait. Using acrylic and tempera paint, as well as colored pencils, I experimented with colors and brushstrokes to achieve expressive formal qualities. I often mixed the paint with water to get a range of opacities that reacted differently with the cardboard surface.”

Nicole Schifferdecker, Newman Smith High School, "Carrot Garden": “In this piece, I created a bizarre twist on a classic self-portrait. Using acrylic and tempera paint, as well as colored pencils, I experimented with colors and brushstrokes to achieve expressive formal qualities. I often mixed the paint with water to get a range of opacities that reacted differently with the cardboard surface.”

Fabiana Perez, Creekview High School, "Life Is as Sunny as Your Smile":  “I created a smiling figure in a bright yellow coat walking through a cloudy night scene. The sunny day contrasting with the cloudy night represents our walk through life. Life is as sunny as you make it.”

Fabiana Perez, Creekview High School, "Life Is as Sunny as Your Smile": “I created a smiling figure in a bright yellow coat walking through a cloudy night scene. The sunny day contrasting with the cloudy night represents our walk through life. Life is as sunny as you make it.”

Emily Quintana, Plano East Senior High School, "Fan": “My concept for this artwork was to create a simple form, a folded ‘v,’ and then repeat that small form until it became a completely different form—a large fan. If you look closely, you can see the rhythm that the folded lines create to give the overall artwork a sense of movement.”

Emily Quintana, Plano East Senior High School, "Fan": “My concept for this artwork was to create a simple form, a folded ‘v,’ and then repeat that small form until it became a completely different form—a large fan. If you look closely, you can see the rhythm that the folded lines create to give the overall artwork a sense of movement.”

Kate Smith, Lovejoy High School, "Deer in Red":  “The idea behind the piece was to focus on color, line, shape, and movement. Through experimentation of oil paint on paper, I created a piece that showed mastery of color and composition. I left some pieces white so that it would give the eye a break from all the color and create movement throughout the piece.”

Kate Smith, Lovejoy High School, "Deer in Red": “The idea behind the piece was to focus on color, line, shape, and movement. Through experimentation of oil paint on paper, I created a piece that showed mastery of color and composition. I left some pieces white so that it would give the eye a break from all the color and create movement throughout the piece.”

Celia Shaheen, Plano West Senior High School, "Suspension":      “This fantasy-oriented photo manipulation serves to challenge a reality perceived by the viewer, creating an ever-widening gap between an abstract and concrete world. The intensity of the piece creates an instinctual response while its simplicity leaves many questions unanswered. Is the figure ascending or descending? In water or in the air?  Dead or alive?”

Celia Shaheen, Plano West Senior High School, "Suspension": “This fantasy-oriented photo manipulation serves to challenge a reality perceived by the viewer, creating an ever-widening gap between an abstract and concrete world. The intensity of the piece creates an instinctual response while its simplicity leaves many questions unanswered. Is the figure ascending or descending? In water or in the air? Dead or alive?”

Shwetha Swaminathan, Plano Senior High School, "The Violin":  “Carving the wood to the exact form of the violin, neck, and scroll was an intense process. The violin represents modern technology while keeping its ancient valor. The circuit board, accurately cut with a rotary grinding tool, gives a modern effect, while the use of gold leaf was intended to make it appear rustic. The contrast of modern versus rustic makes this a unique instrumental sculpture.”

Shwetha Swaminathan, Plano Senior High School, "The Violin": “Carving the wood to the exact form of the violin, neck, and scroll was an intense process. The violin represents modern technology while keeping its ancient valor. The circuit board, accurately cut with a rotary grinding tool, gives a modern effect, while the use of gold leaf was intended to make it appear rustic. The contrast of modern versus rustic makes this a unique instrumental sculpture.”

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