Marrella, called the "lace crab" by Walcott, is the most abundant of all Burgess Shale animals. Over 15,000 individual specimens have been collected from the Walcott Quarry. The strange head shield had two pairs of large spines curving back over the body. Two pairs of antennae project forward and the body consists of a large number of segments bearing identically shaped limbs. The fossil specimens range in size from 1/10th to 3/4th inches. Marrella presumably fed on small animals and organic…

Marrella, called the "lace crab" by Walcott, is the most abundant of all Burgess Shale animals. Over 15,000 individual specimens have been collected from the Walcott Quarry. The strange head shield had two pairs of large spines curving back over the body. Two pairs of antennae project forward and the body consists of a large number of segments bearing identically shaped limbs. The fossil specimens range in size from 1/10th to 3/4th inches. Marrella presumably fed on small animals and organic…

Canadia spinosa, Cambrian annelid worm from the Burgess Shale

Canadia spinosa, Cambrian annelid worm from the Burgess Shale

Micromitra burgessensis Burgess Shale Brachiopod

Micromitra burgessensis Burgess Shale Brachiopod

Fossil of Hallucigenia from the Burgess shale

Fossil of Hallucigenia from the Burgess shale

The most common species to be found in the Burgess shale is Marrella splendens, with 15,000 recorded fossils. It was a small marine arthropod that barely reached 20 mm in lenght. It is recognized by its head shield topped by four backwards-pointing spikes. -Gallery of the Evolution- (Photo: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, RBINS)

The most common species to be found in the Burgess shale is Marrella splendens, with 15,000 recorded fossils. It was a small marine arthropod that barely reached 20 mm in lenght. It is recognized by its head shield topped by four backwards-pointing spikes. -Gallery of the Evolution- (Photo: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, RBINS)

June 2013 : Hallucigenia is an extinct genus of animal found as fossils in the Middle Cambrian-aged Burgess Shale formation of British Columbia.

June 2013 : Hallucigenia is an extinct genus of animal found as fossils in the Middle Cambrian-aged Burgess Shale formation of British Columbia.

The Burgess Shale soft-bodied fossil Wiwaxia corrugata in reflected light (ROM 56950) (photo © David Rudkin, Royal Ontario Museum)

The Burgess Shale soft-bodied fossil Wiwaxia corrugata in reflected light (ROM 56950) (photo © David Rudkin, Royal Ontario Museum)

Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Royal Ontario Museum 61513), 15 mm long. Hallucigenia was originally interpreted upside-down, with its spikes in the sediment and its appendages collecting and passing food towards its large, bulbous head. Image credit: Jean-Bernard Caron.

Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Royal Ontario Museum 61513), 15 mm long. Hallucigenia was originally interpreted upside-down, with its spikes in the sediment and its appendages collecting and passing food towards its large, bulbous head. Image credit: Jean-Bernard Caron.

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