The Yaqui Dances: Pascola Music of the Yaqui Indians of Northern Mexico by Various Artists - Smithsonian Folkways

The Yaqui Dances: Pascola Music of the Yaqui Indians of Northern Mexico by Various Artists - Smithsonian Folkways

Yaqui Indians Sonora Mexico | La vestimenta de la mujer seri -considerado trajae típico de Sonora ...

Yaqui Indians Sonora Mexico | La vestimenta de la mujer seri -considerado trajae típico de Sonora ...

Yaqui turtle tattoo. In honor of Gloria Anzaldua: "I am a turtle. I carry my home on my back."

Yaqui turtle tattoo. In honor of Gloria Anzaldua: "I am a turtle. I carry my home on my back."

The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge (1968) by Carlos Castaneda - 'For a sorcerer, reality, or the world we all know, is only a description that has been pounded into you from the moment you were born. - The reality of our day-to-day life, then, consists of an endless flow of perceptual interpretations which we have learned to make in common.' - Don Juan

The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge (1968) by Carlos Castaneda - 'For a sorcerer, reality, or the world we all know, is only a description that has been pounded into you from the moment you were born. - The reality of our day-to-day life, then, consists of an endless flow of perceptual interpretations which we have learned to make in common.' - Don Juan

Yaqui Indian Arrows 1893, Collected by Edward Palmer. Yaqui Arrows were made in two styles and were measured in length from 32 to 46 inches. Stone arrow heads were used and wooden tip arrows which was sharpened and burned at the tip to add weight and strength to the arrow. Poison was used depending on the Mountain Yaqui Band and was taken from rattlesnakes or scorpions and were sun dried to add it's lethal potency. Even if the arrow did not hit a vital organ, the poison would kill within…

Yaqui Indian Arrows 1893, Collected by Edward Palmer. Yaqui Arrows were made in two styles and were measured in length from 32 to 46 inches. Stone arrow heads were used and wooden tip arrows which was sharpened and burned at the tip to add weight and strength to the arrow. Poison was used depending on the Mountain Yaqui Band and was taken from rattlesnakes or scorpions and were sun dried to add it's lethal potency. Even if the arrow did not hit a vital organ, the poison would kill within…

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