Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

This clay tablet from ancient Babylon describes monthly rations allowed to Jehoiachin, a Jewish king. The Biblical account of King Jehoiachin is found in 2 Kings 25:29-30, which also states that he received a "regular allowance" from the king of Babylon. The tablet was made in c. 595-570 BC, discovered in Babylon in c. 1900. The text is in the Akkadian language using cuneiform script. The artifact is now located in the Museum of the Ancient Near East, Pergamum Museum, Berlin.

38
3

CYLINDER SEALS - Used as a means of stamping and identifying documents... Simply roll the seal out on clay and get the image! These seals are just a couple of inches long. Ancient Near East

62
6

Greek Bee Fibula, 4th century BC The bee, found in the artifacts of Ancient Near East and Aegean cultures, was believed to be the sacred insect that bridged the natural world to the underworld. Apollo's gift of prophecy first came to him from three bee maidens, usually identified with the Thriae. The Thriae was a trinity of pre-Hellenic Aegean bee goddesses.

112
16

9,000-year-old limestone mask from the Judean desert, among the earliest sculptural types to survive from the ancient Near East.

19
4
1

Roman Shield ~ "The winged sun is a symbol associated with divinity, royalty and power in the Ancient Near East (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Persia" --wikipedia

228
26

This is a map of the Ancient Near East and it shows where the Hittites, Egyptians, Babylonians and Assyrians  during the 16th 14th century BC.

163
20

The bee, found in Ancient Near East and Aegean cultures, was believed to be the sacred insect that bridged the natural world to the underworld. Appearing in tomb decorations, Mycenaean tholos tombs were even shaped as beehives - this is the omphalos in the museum of Delphi

45
9

This clay tablet from ancient Babylon describes monthly rations allowed to Jehoiachin, a Jewish king. The Biblical account of King Jehoiachin is found in 2 Kings 25:29-30, which also states that he received a "regular allowance" from the king of Babylon. The tablet was made in c. 595-570 BC. The text is in the Akkadian language using cuneiform script, and the tablet measures roughly 4 x 4 inches. The artifact is now located in the Museum of the Ancient Near East, Pergamum Museum, Berlin.

115
8