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Anglo saxon kingdoms

Ancient boundaries are the strongest

A study released last week shows that up to 40 per cent of our DNA may be from Germanic ancestors, and not the Vikings, thanks to the Anglo-Saxon migrations here in 450-600AD. The project is particularly interesting because it would seem that our genetic make-up bares out those old traditions and clichés about how we relate to each other. So the age-old rivalries between Devon and Cornwall – take for example the bitter wars fought over whether you put jam or cream on a scone first...

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It is clear that the formation of a Pictish nation that united the peoples of Scotland was due to the arrival of the Romans.

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Alfred the Great, England’s Strong and Righteous Ruler

Alfred the Great, was King of Wessex from 871 to 899. Alfred is noted for his defence of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern England against the Vikings, becoming the only English king to be accorded the epithet “the Great”. Alfred was the first King of the West Saxons to style himself “King of the Anglo-Saxons”.

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n the Dark Ages during the fifth and sixth centuries, communities of peoples in Britain inhabited homelands with ill-defined borders. Such communities were organised and led by chieftains or kings. Following the final withdrawal of the Roman legions from the provinces of Britannia in around 408 AD these small kingdoms were left to preserve their own order and to deal with invaders and waves of migrant peoples such as the Picts from beyond Hadrian's Wall, the Scots from Ireland and Germanic…

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What Were English Trials and Ordeals, During the Middle Ages?

Alfred the Great, King of the English. A wise man and a great leader. Google Image Result for http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/22/Statue_d%27Alfred_le_Grand_%C3%A0_Winchester.jpg/220px-Statue_d%27Alfred_le_Grand_%C3%A0_Winchester.jpg

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immigrants from Denmark, Netherlands, and Germany spoke a cluster of related dialects falling within the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. Their language began to develop its own distinctive features in isolation from the continental Germanic languages, and by 600 A.D. had developed into what we call Old English or Anglo-Saxon, covering the territory of most of modern England.

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