The Battle of Plataea (479BCE), where a Greek allied force, under the command of the Spartan General, Pausanius, defeated the remaining Persian expeditionary forces, forcing the remnants of the army to make for Persian held territory at Byzantion.

The Battle of Plataea (479BCE), where a Greek allied force, under the command of the Spartan General, Pausanius, defeated the remaining Persian expeditionary forces, forcing the remnants of the army to make for Persian held territory at Byzantion.

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The Serpent Column — also known as the Serpentine Column, Delphi Tripod or Plataean Tripod — is an ancient bronze column at the Hippodrome of Constantinople (known as Atmeydanı Horse Square in the Ottoman period) in what is now Istanbul, Turkey. It is part of an ancient Greek sacrificial tripod, originally in Delphi and relocated to Constantinople by Constantine I the Great in 324.

The Serpent Column — also known as the Serpentine Column, Delphi Tripod or Plataean Tripod — is an ancient bronze column at the Hippodrome of Constantinople (known as Atmeydanı Horse Square in the Ottoman period) in what is now Istanbul, Turkey. It is part of an ancient Greek sacrificial tripod, originally in Delphi and relocated to Constantinople by Constantine I the Great in 324.

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Spartan General Pausanias. Pausanias was a Spartan general of the 5th century BCE, responsible for the Greek victory over Mardonius and the Persians at the Battle of Plataea in 479 BCE, and was the leader of the Hellenic League created to resist Persian aggression during the Greco-Persian Wars.

Spartan General Pausanias. Pausanias was a Spartan general of the 5th century BCE, responsible for the Greek victory over Mardonius and the Persians at the Battle of Plataea in 479 BCE, and was the leader of the Hellenic League created to resist Persian aggression during the Greco-Persian Wars.

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Battle of Marathon is located in Greece

Battle of Marathon is located in Greece

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Following the crucial Greek victory at the naval Battle of Salamis in September 480 BCE, Xerxes’ planned invasion of Greece met a serious setback but his massive army was still intact, and if the Greeks were to survive as independent city-states they would have to fight and win on land; the battlefield would be near the small town of Plataea in Boeotia in 479 BCE. (Info by Mark Cartwright) -- AHE

Following the crucial Greek victory at the naval Battle of Salamis in September 480 BCE, Xerxes’ planned invasion of Greece met a serious setback but his massive army was still intact, and if the Greeks were to survive as independent city-states they would have to fight and win on land; the battlefield would be near the small town of Plataea in Boeotia in 479 BCE. (Info by Mark Cartwright) -- AHE

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