The fastest binary star pair ever discovered, HM Cancri, orbit each other at 310 miles per second

The fastest binary star pair ever discovered, HM Cancri, orbit each other at 310 miles per second

pin 195
heart 34
speech 1
White dwarf stars photographed through the Hubble Telescope. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

White dwarf stars photographed through the Hubble Telescope. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

pin 9
heart 2
For the first time, researchers have detected a streamer of gas flowing from a massive outer disc toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disc of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago. Half of Sun-like stars are born in binary systems, meaning that these findings will have major consequences for the hunt for exoplanets. (ESO)

For the first time, researchers have detected a streamer of gas flowing from a massive outer disc toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disc of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago. Half of Sun-like stars are born in binary systems, meaning that these findings will have major consequences for the hunt for exoplanets. (ESO)

pin 430
heart 86
speech 1
For the first time, scientists studying data from the Kepler Space Telescope have found multiple planets orbiting a binary star.

For the first time, scientists studying data from the Kepler Space Telescope have found multiple planets orbiting a binary star.

pin 153
heart 8
Glorious Sirius looks like one bright star but is actually a binary system composed of 2 stars (Sirius A, the brighter & Sirius B, a faint white dwarf). Together, they glitter like a silver-blue diamond! Binary stars are too close to be distinguished from one another when observed from Earth and are hence mistaken for one. The two stars of a binary typically orbit about a common center of mass. Sirius is easy to see in the spring and winter skies.

Glorious Sirius looks like one bright star but is actually a binary system composed of 2 stars (Sirius A, the brighter & Sirius B, a faint white dwarf). Together, they glitter like a silver-blue diamond! Binary stars are too close to be distinguished from one another when observed from Earth and are hence mistaken for one. The two stars of a binary typically orbit about a common center of mass. Sirius is easy to see in the spring and winter skies.

pin 287
heart 42
The star system is named DI Cha, and while only two stars are apparent, it is actually a quadruple system containing two sets of binary stars...

The star system is named DI Cha, and while only two stars are apparent, it is actually a quadruple system containing two sets of binary stars...

pin 44
heart 6
Binary Star Systems: Classification and Evolution

Binary Star Systems: Classification and Evolution

speech 1
Death Star: Eta Carinae, one of the closest stars to Earth is huge and unstable and will likely explode in a supernova in the relatively 'near future' (On an astronomical timeline this could be a million years from now). via NASA  #Eta_Carinae #Supernova #NASA

Death Star: Eta Carinae, one of the closest stars to Earth is huge and unstable and will likely explode in a supernova in the relatively 'near future' (On an astronomical timeline this could be a million years from now). via NASA #Eta_Carinae #Supernova #NASA

pin 960
heart 308
speech 5
When seen in visible light Zeta Ophiuchi appears as a relatively dim red star surrounded by other dim stars and no dust. But in this infrared image taken with NASA's WISE a completely different view emerges. Zeta Ophiuchi is actually a very massive, hot, bright blue star plowing its way through a large cloud of interstellar dust and gas. It was likely once part of a binary star system with an even more massive partner that exploded as a supernova, blasting away most of its mass.

When seen in visible light Zeta Ophiuchi appears as a relatively dim red star surrounded by other dim stars and no dust. But in this infrared image taken with NASA's WISE a completely different view emerges. Zeta Ophiuchi is actually a very massive, hot, bright blue star plowing its way through a large cloud of interstellar dust and gas. It was likely once part of a binary star system with an even more massive partner that exploded as a supernova, blasting away most of its mass.

pin 104
heart 16
Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas
Search