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Black People And Watermelon

from Can You Actually

50 Incredibly Useful Life Hacks You Won’t Believe You Didn’t Know

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This was an advertisement for a piece of art back in the 1920s. It is a picture of an infant-like African-American holding onto their stereotypical favorite food, a watermelon. It is wearing a diaper and holding a bottle, like a baby. It looks like a baby because babies are lower down on the human pyramid, implying that people in the 1920s had thought all black people were lesser than the white. Slavery may have been abolished, but black people were still looked down upon.

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I just don't understand how that is supposed to make anyone want to buy ginger. It doesn't even make me want watermelon. Cuz there might be angry babies hiding in them.

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from Abagond

The watermelon stereotype

This image sets incorrect expectations that all people of color like watermelon - a trait that's become ingrained in stereotypical associations with black people.

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from USATODAY.COM

Coastal residents aim to preserve rich African culture

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The Gullah/Geechee people speak a creole language similar to the Sierra Leone Krio of their origin. They use African names, tell African folktales and make African-style handicrafts. They introduced us to many new foods and new ways of preparing them. Some of the foods brought from Africa were peanuts, okra, rice, yams, peas, hot peppers, sesame seeds, sorghum, and watermelon. The southern way of frying foods came from the Gullah. photo: Charleston SC Gullah street vendor, about 1900.

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