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It took 40,000 Black people walking to work for 381 days in Montgomery bus boycott and Rosa Parks to make history.

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The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding on December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama when she was arrested for her refusal to give up her seat to a white person which sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

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Google Image Result for http://www.biographyonline.net/humanitarian/images/rosa-parks/rosa-parks.jpg

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Selma-Montgomery March: Martin Luther King leading march from Selma to Montgomery to protest lack of voting rights for African Americans. Beside King is US Congressman John Lewis, Reverend Jesse Douglas, James Forman and Ralph Abernathy. March 1965.

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from blackmail4u.wordpress.com

60th Anniversary Of The Montgomery Bus Boycott – December 1, 2015

In 1955 and 1956 thousands of supporters participated in a mass boycott of Montgomery buses that lasted 381 days. African Americans organized carpools or car sharing to support those in the community who opted to rely on automobiles rather than public transportation. Flyers like this one advertised carpooling services and helped to keep the boycott going strong.

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Beyond the Bus: Teaching the Unseen Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott | Teaching Tolerance

from NPR.org

Before Rosa Parks, There Was Claudette Colvin

Claudette Colvin: b. 1939; Claudette Colvin is a pioneer of the African-American civil rights movement. In 1955, she was the first person arrested for resisting bus segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, preceding the better known Rosa Parks incident by nine months. Montgomery's black leaders did not publicize Colvin's effort for long because she was a teenager and became an unmarried mother. Given the social norms of the time, the NAACP leaders worried about using her to represent their…

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For 382 days, almost the entire African-American population of Montgomery, Alabama, including leaders Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks, refused to ride on segregated buses, a turning point in the American civil rights movement.

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Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King at the Montgomery, Alabama courthouse where Dr. King was tried for leading the bus boycott that brought national attention to the Civil Rights Movement.

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