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Cassandra Greek Mythology

Cassandra: As a child she and her twin brother Helenus were given the gift of prophecy when two snakes came upon the babes one night and licked their ears clean. When morning came the snakes slithered into sacred laurels, a symbol of the god Apollo. As a young woman she rejected the affections of the god and he in turn cursed her: while she still had the gift of prophecy no one would believe her and she would be spurned and thought of as mad...

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modern mythology au: cassandra A liar and a madwoman, they called her, and cast her out. When Cassandra started a band, playing gigs in backalley bars until she not only forgot Apollo, but herself, Cassandra vowed one thing- she would make them listen. There, in the very lyrics of her songs, lay their fates

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from Playbuzz

Which Greek God Are You?

"Look down on yourselves from the stars, I cried, Look down on yourselves from the stars. They heard me and lowered their eyes." Wislawa Szymborska, 'Soliloquy for Cassandra'; painting 'Ajax and Cassandra' by Solomon Joseph Solomon

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Cassandra {princess of Troy}; daughter of Priam and Hecuba | gifted of prophecy by Apollo but cursed that no one would believe her predictions

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Ajax taking Cassandra, tondo of a red-figure kylix by the Kodros Painter, c. 440-430 BC, Louvre

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from BuzzFeed Community

Community Post: 13 Weird Wikipedia Lists To Waste Your Time On

Cassandra / priestess / prophetess / fiver

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He gave her a gift that would bring frustration and despair to her.

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cassandra of troy was supposedly the most beautiful of priam’s daughters. the god apollo gave her the gift of prophecy to seduce her, and when she refused him, he cursed her so she would never be believed.

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Tragic Greek ladies (Medea, Cassandra, Pandora, Antigone)

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In Greek mythology, the daughter of Priam, the last king of Troy, and his wife Hecuba. In Homer’s Iliad, she is the most beautiful of Priam’s daughters, but not a prophetess. According to Aeschylus’s tragedy...

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