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from National Geographic News

Dead Sea Scrolls Mystery Solved?

Dead Sea Scrolls: Discovered first in 1947 in desert caves. Ascribed by some scholars to the Essenes, an ancient Jewish sect, dated to the turn of B.C. to A.D.


Some of the Dead Sea Scrolls were hidden in jars which were later found in the excavation of Qumran. This type of pottery is unknown elsewhere: since it was found in the caves where the scrolls were hidden, and in the Qumran ruins, many believe it is conclusive proof that the scrolls were written in Qumran.


The Dead sea Scrolls. Between 1947 and 1956 Qumran has been the most important archaeological site of the world . In this period a collection of 972 ancient texts in 11 different caves has been found. The majority of them are made of parchment or papyrus, mainly written in Hebrew and Aramaic and few in Greek... It was said that these scrolls also contained the Book of Enoch which tells the story of him being abducted by other-worldly beings.

from Live Science

New Texts Found in Caves That Yielded Dead Sea Scrolls

In 1947 a Bedouin shepherd unearthed the first of nearly 900 texts that would come to be known as the Dead Sea Scrolls. They were found in a series of 11 caves near Qumran, Israel (shown here).


Qumran Israel - Jars in which the Dead Sea Scrolls were found. Cave #1. 1st C. BCE - 1st C. CE. Pottery. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Dead Sea Scrolls Museum.


Some scholars have argued that the scrolls were the product of Jews living in Jerusalem, who hid the scrolls in the caves near Qumran while fleeing from the Romans during the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE. Karl Heinrich Rengstorf first proposed that the Dead Sea Scrolls originated at the library of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.[35] Later, Norman Golb suggested that the scrolls were the product of multiple libraries in Jerusalem, and not necessarily the Jerusalem Temple library.[6]