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from Teachers Pay Teachers

DNA FINGERPRINTING: Modeling Gel Electrophoresis to Solve a Crime

Use gel electrophoresis to solve a crime! Perfect for teaching students to use DNA technology in a STEM STEAM class or in Biology or Forensics.

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DNA Fingerprinting Activity from the Nanotechnology Center for Learning and Teaching - The prep on this might take a while, but you could use it for years to come. Think I might add it to my list of summer projects.

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This sample life science curriculum has a nice activity on observing and classifying fingerprints.

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Gel electrophoresis is a powerful technique used to manipulate DNA and as an analytical tool, such as in DNA fingerprinting. Build your own gel electrophoresis device from scratch with simple materials, and use electricity to separate colored dyes.

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130 - DNA Fingerprinting by PCR Amplification

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Create a DNA Fingerprint the case of the licked lollipop, and you have to solve it. Fortunately, you have the latest forensic technology on your side: DNA profiling. This interactive feature guides you through the process of creating DNA profiles of several criminal suspects and tissue evidence left at the crime scene

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from Teachers Pay Teachers

DNA Crime Lab! Can you solve the case?

With a focus on literacy and collaboration, this activity teaches students about the importance of enzymes, DNA sequencing, fingerprinting, mutations that can happen if we smoke and even what it means to be a twin. | by Scaffolded Math and Science

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from Teachers Pay Teachers

DNA Crime Lab! Can you solve the case?

Each group is given a long paper strip of DNA, the story of the missing necklace and directions on how to fingerprint and sequence their DNA. Scissors act as the restriction enzyme, cutting the DNA between every CCGG into varied length segments. As the segments are pasted into the corresponding rows on the sequencing board (imitating gel electrophoresis), the DNA fingerprint of each suspect will emerge. So, who stole the necklace? Be a crime stopper!

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from Teachers Pay Teachers

DNA Crime Lab! Can you solve the case?

DNA crime scene investigation. Each group is given a long paper strip of DNA, a 3-page story of the missing necklace and directions on how to fingerprint and sequence their DNA. Scissors act as the restriction enzyme, cutting the DNA between every CCGG into varied length segments. As the segments are pasted into the corresponding rows on the sequencing board (imitating gel electrophoresis), the DNA fingerprint of each suspect will emerge. So, who stole the necklace?

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