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Eleanor Of Aquitaine

Henry II was notorious for his illicit relations with other men’s wives, and for having several illegitimate children. However, few records containing information about them have survived, and only records about the most infamous mistresses would have been written to start with. Henry II married Eleanor of Aquitaine in 1152. Generation 28 on family tree.

Eleanor of Aquitaine's effigy at Fontrevault. Queen of France and England, she was known for her passion for reading. (note her belt)

One of the most powerful women of the Middle Ages, Eleanor of Aquitaine was Countess of Poitou, Queen of France and later Queen of England. She influenced politics, sponsored the Courtly Love movement, and even went on Crusade.

Fontevraud Abbey - Loire Valley, France. Final resting place of Eleanor of Aquitaine and King Henry II.

Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine Plantagenet; 27th Great Grandmother

Eleanor of Aquitaine on the left with a companion, probably Isabella of Angoulême, from a mural in the Chapel of St. Radegund, Chinon

Eleanor of Aquitaine- one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). She was the patroness of such literary figures as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-More, and Chrétien de Troyes. She also went on the Crusades with her husband. Really fascinating woman! #WHM

Eleanor of Aquitaine Ruby Ring | Hedgerow Rose

Mathilda Plantagenet, daughter of Henry II and Eleanore of Aquitaine Birth: 1156 Death: Jun. 28, 1189 Princess of England. Daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Married the 27 years o...

Worksheets: Women in History: Eleanor of Aquitaine

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204) The most powerful woman of the High Middle Ages. Mother to three Plantagenet Kings: Henry (the Young King), Richard (the Lionheart) and John.

Eleanor of Aquitaine rock crystal vase. Eleanor gave the vase to her first husband Louis VII of France as a wedding gift. He in turn donated it to the Abbey of Saint-Denis.

The first woman to ask for divorce and lead an army, Eleanor of Aquitaine lived until she was 82 (pretty good considering most died in their 40s). She got a formal education, which was really rare for women in that era. There are rumours that she poisoned her second husband Henry II’s mistress, the Fair Rosamund. This lady’s bad-ass. (Painting by Edmund Blair Leighton)

Henry II had Eleanor imprisoned for the next 16 years. In 1189, Henry died and Eleanor of Aquitaine's favorite son, Richard the Lionheart, became king (his older brother Henry had already died). Richard soon went away on the Third Crusade, leaving his mother as regent of England. Eleanor survived Richard and lived long into the reign of her youngest son, King John. Like his brother, King John respected his mother and heeded her advice so that even at the age of 77,

♥ Eleanor stamp, 2004. Eleanor of Aquitaine married a King of France, then a King of England, went on a crusade, plotted, was imprisoned in a castle. She was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. en.wikipedia.org/...

Eleanor of Aquitaine (Queen of France and England 1154)

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was Queen Consort of France,and also Queen Consort of England. She was one of the most powerful women in Middle Ages. In 1157 she gave birth to her favorite son Richard the Lionheart. She outlived all her children except for King John and Eleanor, Queen of Castile. Eleanor of Aquitaine was renowned for her powerful personality and leading her sons in rebellion against their father, King Henry II.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (c.1122-1204) bore Henry II of England 3 daughters & 5 sons. In addition to being Queen Consort, Eleanor regained her position as Duchess of Aquitaine & ruled her home state independently; she was an excellent ruler & she was much beloved by her people. Eleanor & Henry (pictured here) were a match politically & romantically, although sometimes Henry's eye wandered. But his brief affairs were never a threat to Eleanor until he became infatuated with Rosamund Clifford.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122 or 1124–1204) was the French wife of two medieval kings. After petitioning for her own divorce from her first husband, she negotiated her own marriage to Henry II of England. Eleanor was an especially active Queen Consort, as well as a capable ruler of her own domain in Aquitaine. When Henry II tried to limit her autonomous power there, she, with the help of her sons, rebelled. Click through to the link to read an (abridged) biography of her fascinating life...

SEAL OF ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE / HISTORIC WAXCRAFT / WIEBER COLLECTION

I was expecting Eleanor of Aquitaine to be in a much more ferocious pose and outfit - this must be a very young Eleanor. (Image from Biographical Sketches of the Queens of Great Britain, from the Norman Conquest to the Reign of Victoria, or Royal Book of Beauty)

Henry Fitzempress, Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine. Duke of Normandy and the Aquitiane. King of England. Eleanor of Aqutaine, Queen of England and at one time, Queen of France, Duchess of the Aqutaine. When they met he was 19 and she was probably 30. She gave him 8 children. 7 Survived to maturity, as did two princesses of France

Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of France, Queen of England, Mother & Grandmother of Kings and Queens Eleanor of Aquitaine was one of the most powerful women in the world in the medieval era. Married first to the King of France -- and divorced from him in part because she had no sons -- she went on to have sons and daughters with her second husband, King of England.

Great Women (Coloring Book Paper Dolls)

Eleanor of Aquitaine, wife of two kings: Louis VII of France & Henry II of England, mother of two more: Richard the Lionhearted & Nasty King John (yes, that's his official title, in my book, anyway); she went on a Crusade with Louis & ruled England temporarily in Richard's absence in the Holy Land.