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The Galactic Center in Infrared | The center of our Galaxy is a busy place. In visible light, much of the Galactic Center is obscured by opaque dust. In infrared light, however, dust glows more and obscures less, allowing nearly one million stars to be recorded in the featured photograph. The Galactic Center itself appears on the left and is located about 30,000 light years away towards the constellation of the Archer (Sagittarius).

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The center of our Milky Way Galaxy is hidden from the prying eyes of optical telescopes by clouds of obscuring dust and gas. But the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared cameras, penetrate much of the dust revealing the stars of the crowded galactic center region. Stars are packed together and race around the supermassive black hole that lies at the center. Our sun is located 26,000 light-years away in a more peaceful, spacious neighborhood, out in the galactic suburbs.

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Galactic Center Region | The sites will unveil a giant, 6-foot-by-3-foot print of the bustling hub of our galaxy that combines a near-infrared view from the Hubble Space Telescope, an infrared view from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and an X-ray view from the Chandra X-ray Observatory into one multiwavelength picture. Experts from all three observatories carefully assembled the final image from large mosaic photo surveys taken by each telescope.

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Astronomers have obtained an unprecedented look at the nearest example of galactic cannibalism: a massive black hole hidden at the center of a nearby giant galaxy that is feeding on a smaller galaxy in a spectacular collision

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from Socks On An Octopus

NASA's Astronomy Picture Of The Day: Venus, Zodiacal Light, And The Galactic Center

Map of heaven with Zodiac From a medieval illuminated manuscript from Burgo de Osma, which contains among others the book of Marcus Tullius Cicero with the title: "Somnium Scipionis" with a comment from Macrobius. century

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The Milky Way’s Center seen in Infrared | This dazzling infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows hundreds of thousands of stars crowded into the swirling core of our spiral Milky Way galaxy. In visible-light pictures, this region cannot be seen at all because dust lying between Earth and the galactic center blocks our view.

View of the 'Milky Way' in the direction of the constellation of Sagittarius - we're 2/3 of the way out on the spiral arm & so are seeing into the star density of the Galactic Center.

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