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Einstein's general theory of relativity suggests, among other things, that masses in space distort the geometry of space-time. In addition, moving objects emit waves of gravitational radiation that carry energy away into space.

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from Live Science

Wacky Physics: The Coolest Little Particles in Nature

The field of quantum mechanics all fundamental forces are carried by particles. For instance, light is made up of massless particles called photons that carry the electromagnetic force. Likewise, the graviton is the theoretical particle that would carry the force of gravity. Scientists have yet to detect gravitons, which are tricky to find because they interact so weakly with matter.

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from The Huffington Post

Hunt For Elusive 'Gravity Waves' Heats Up

When two extremely dense objects, such as neutron stars (stars so dense the protons and electrons in their atoms collapse to form neutrons) or black holes, orbit each other in binary pairs, their interactions should create ripples in the fabric of space-time called gravitational waves.

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Gravity waves, gravitational waves and primordial gravitational waves... what do they mean? Is there a difference?

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from Live Science

Gravitational Waves vs. Gravity Waves: Know the Difference!

Gravity waves, gravitational waves and primordial gravitational waves... what do they mean? Is there a difference? YES.

Gravitational Waves vs. Gravity Waves: Know the Difference! : Discovery News; Gravity Waves are physical perturbations driven by the restoring force of gravity in a planetary environment. Gravitational Waves are, in their most basic sense, ripples in spacetime. Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicted them over a century ago and they are generated by the acceleration (or, indeed, deceleration) of massive objects in the cosmos.

New technology has been developed to detect the gravity waves first predicted by Einstein in 1916. Gravity waves are ripples in space generated by extreme cosmic events such as colliding stars, black holes, and supernova explosions.

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