Humans are just the latest in a long line of hominid species that have emerged in the past six million years.
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Sahelanthropus tchadensis This species was named in 2002 from fossils discovered in Central Africa. It is the oldest known hominid/near-hominid species, dated between 6 and 7 million years old. It is not known whether it was bipedal. It has Primitive apelike features, a very small brain size, brow ridges and small canine teeth. It comes from around the time when the hominids are thought to have diverged from chimpanzees which suggests it's close to the common ancestor of humans and…

Sahelanthropus tchadensis This species was named in 2002 from fossils discovered in Central Africa. It is the oldest known hominid/near-hominid species, dated between 6 and 7 million years old. It is not known whether it was bipedal. It has Primitive apelike features, a very small brain size, brow ridges and small canine teeth. It comes from around the time when the hominids are thought to have diverged from chimpanzees which suggests it's close to the common ancestor of humans and…

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Homo habilis The first hominid species to make stone tools, Homo habilis - meaning handyman

Homo habilis The first hominid species to make stone tools, Homo habilis - meaning handyman

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New hominid species may have been neighbor to famed 'Lucy' - CSMonitor.com

New hominid species may have been neighbor to famed 'Lucy' - CSMonitor.com

Module 9 Ch 10 Human Evolution Approximately, 8 million years ago lush forests covered most of the African continent. During this time, Miocene ape species flourished because they were very successful in the arboreal environment. However, about 6 million years ago, the climate in Africa became dryer and the majority of the Miocene apes went extinct due to the loss of the forests. Yet, some species thrived, and one of those species was the oldest common ancestor of today’s modern humans.

Module 9 Ch 10 Human Evolution Approximately, 8 million years ago lush forests covered most of the African continent. During this time, Miocene ape species flourished because they were very successful in the arboreal environment. However, about 6 million years ago, the climate in Africa became dryer and the majority of the Miocene apes went extinct due to the loss of the forests. Yet, some species thrived, and one of those species was the oldest common ancestor of today’s modern humans.

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Kingdom . Animalia / Phylum : Chordata / Class : Mammalia / Order : Primates / Family : Hominidae / Genus : Homo / Species : H. ergaster

Kingdom . Animalia / Phylum : Chordata / Class : Mammalia / Order : Primates / Family : Hominidae / Genus : Homo / Species : H. ergaster

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From left to right: Homo habilis, Homo Sapiens, Homo floresiensis, Homo Erectus, Paranthropus boisei, Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis

From left to right: Homo habilis, Homo Sapiens, Homo floresiensis, Homo Erectus, Paranthropus boisei, Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis

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The engraving that shows the foetal mummy (curiously found in the English translation but not in the Spanish original) does not depict the extreme of cranial deformation that Childress claims is genetic in origin: while the skull appears dolichocephalic, it appears to be entirely in the range of normal human foetuses. the engraving does not show a foetus in a natural position, but in the position of a typical Andean mummy. It also appears to be wearing a kilt.

The engraving that shows the foetal mummy (curiously found in the English translation but not in the Spanish original) does not depict the extreme of cranial deformation that Childress claims is genetic in origin: while the skull appears dolichocephalic, it appears to be entirely in the range of normal human foetuses. the engraving does not show a foetus in a natural position, but in the position of a typical Andean mummy. It also appears to be wearing a kilt.

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Homo neanderthalensis dates back only 28,000 to 200,000 years ago. It is not an ancestor of humans but a separate hominid species that lived simultaneously with humans for a while before extinction. Some scientists believe the 2 hominid species may have interbred. Evidence shows that Neanderthals may have dug graves for their dead, which marks the first of the hominids to do so.

Homo neanderthalensis dates back only 28,000 to 200,000 years ago. It is not an ancestor of humans but a separate hominid species that lived simultaneously with humans for a while before extinction. Some scientists believe the 2 hominid species may have interbred. Evidence shows that Neanderthals may have dug graves for their dead, which marks the first of the hominids to do so.

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