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The Flood of Noah and the Flood of Gilgamesh | The Institute for Creation Research

"Project Based Learning is an inquiry method of learning, responding to questions, problems or challenges. This is important because it causes stronger learning and retention." -Project Based Learning | BIE

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Learn how you should be marketing your infographics in this 12 part guide. http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2012/06/content-we-crave/ #infographics

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Now THIS is an absolute TREASURE ! An awesome virtual lab created by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. This free program could be used for many inquiry and NGSS lessons.

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from Corkboard Connections

Bring Some Passion Into Your Classroom!

"Genius Hour allows your students to explore their passions. For one hour a week, they read, research, plan and design their passion projects. Students can take on any topic they are passionate about, and create a project they can share with the class, the school … the world!"

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Ultimate Autism Guide | The Ultimate Source for Autism Information | List of Research for Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) as an Autism Treatment | Empirical research for ABA as a treatment for autism

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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a research-based set of principles to guide the design of learning environments that are accessible and effective for all. First articulated by CAST in the 1990s and now the leading framework in an international reform movement, UDL informs all of our work in educational research and development, capacity building, and professional learning.

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A look at the diversity of structures in the PDB archive. These images, shown to scale, were created by David S. Goodsell (The Scripps Research Institute), who also writes and illustrates the RCSB PDB's Molecule of the Month feature. An expanded version of this figure is available for download from http://www.pdb.org .

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The logo combines three figurative representations — a microscopic view of a parasite, a genome map of a bacterium, and a rendering of a virus (...) Appearing in numerous forms and colours, the ever-changing logo relates to the nature of BIPR’s work.

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