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from Spiderwick Chronicles Wiki

The Knocker

The Knocker, Knacker, Bwca (Welsh), Bucca (Cornish) or Tommyknocker (US) is a mythical creature in Welsh, Cornish and Devon folklore. They are the equivalent of Irish leprechauns and English and Scottish brownies. About two feet tall and grizzled, but not misshapen, they live beneath the ground. Here they wear tiny versions of standard miner's garb and commit random mischief, such as stealing miners' unattended tools and food.

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from Crystal Wind™

The Irish Banshee

Maybe she's like... I dunno, maybe she has two sides to her... split personalities, one side is kindhearted and wants to help, and the other is evil and wants to hurt, and her appearance reflects this - beautiful when kind, ugly when evil.

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from Toptenz.net

Top 10 Irish Myths and Legends

Faeries hold a special importance to the irish. An irish fairy can take any form she wishes.

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Pixies are mythical creatures of folklore, considered to be particularly concentrated in the high moorland areas around Devon and Cornwall, suggesting some Celtic origin for the belief and name - akin to the Irish sidhe believed to inhabit ancient underground ancestor sites such as stone circles, barrows, quoits or standing stones.

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from Etsy

new 70s Irish Linen Towel Tea Dish - QUEEN'S BEASTS Coats of Arms Heraldic Symbols - Lion Griffin Unicorn Dragon Horse - Ulster - blue nwot

Unused vintage Irish Linen Towel by Ulster Weavers of Ireland featuring the QUEEN'S BEASTS, mythical creatures and the coats of arms from the English monarch's genealogy, by AngelGrace on Etsy.

Pixies are mythical creatures of folklore, considered to be particularly concentrated in the high moorland areas around Devon and Cornwall,suggesting some Celtic origin for the belief and name. Akin to the Irish and Scottish Aos Sí, pixies are believed to inhabit ancient underground ancestor sites such as stone circles, barrows, dolmens, ringfort or menhirs.

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The Irish Ballybogs, known as bogles among the Cornish and Welsh and Boggans among those residing in Northern England, are also called Peat Faeries, Mudbogs, Boggies and Bog-a-boos. The reoccurrence of the word bog in their name harkens to their typical habitat: peat bogs and mudholes. They were most typically encountered in Ireland, where people uesd peat as a main source of fuel because Ireland lacks natural coal and oil deposits.

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Tylwyth Teg (Middle Welsh for "Fair Family";[1] Welsh pronunciation: [ˈtəlwɨ̞θ teːɡ]) is the most usual term in Wales for the mythological creatures corresponding to the Irish Sidhe, comparable to the fairies of English and continental folklore.

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