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Raijū a legendary creature from Japanese mythology. Its body is composed of lightning and may be in the shape of a cat, fox, weasel, or wolf.

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Japanese mythology includes a vast number of gods, goddesses, and spirits. Most of the stories concern the creation of the world, the foundation of the islands of Japan, and the activities of deities, humans, animals, spirits, and magical creatures. Some myths describe characters and events associated with particular places in Japan. Others are set in legendary locations, such as the heavens or the underworld. Read more: http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Iz-Le/Japanese-Mythology.html

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Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater: The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

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Susanoo [須佐之男], also known as Takehaya Susanoo-no-Mikoto, is the Shinto god of the sea and storms. In Japanese mythology, Susanoo, the powerful storm of Summer, is the brother of Amaterasu, the goddess of the Sun, and of Tsukuyomi, the god of the Moon. A long-standing rivalry exists between Susanoo and his sister.

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In japanese mythology Jorōgumo (絡新婦) is a 400 years old demonic spider that can change its appearance into that of a seductive woman. Generally, in all mythologies the most evil and deadly demons are depicted as women.

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The raijyu is a legendary creature from Japanese mythology. Its body is composed of lightning and may be in the shape of a cat, fox, weasel, or wolf. The form of a white and blue wolf (or even a wolf wrapped in lightning) is also common. It may also fly about as a ball of lightning (in fact, the creature may be an attempt to explain the phenomenon of lightning). Its cry sounds like thunder.

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Tsukuyomi or Tsukiyomi [月読], also known as Tsukiyomi-no-mikoto, is the moon god in Shinto and Japanese mythology. Tsukuyomi was the second of the “three noble children” born when Izanagi-no-Mikoto, the god who created the first land of Onogoro-shima, was cleansing himself of his sins while bathing after escaping the underworld and the clutches of his enraged dead wife, Izanami-no-Mikoto. Tsukuyomi was born when he washed out of Izanagi’s right eye.

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