Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer, serving with distinction in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars, and was also one of the most senior general officers in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was unrelated to Albert Sidney Johnston, another high-ranking Confederate general.

Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer, serving with distinction in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars, and was also one of the most senior general officers in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was unrelated to Albert Sidney Johnston, another high-ranking Confederate general.

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CSA General Joseph E. Johnston would be remembered by many people after the Civil War as "retreating Joe". But it is also possible his actions in 1862 may have

CSA General Joseph E. Johnston would be remembered by many people after the Civil War as "retreating Joe". But it is also possible his actions in 1862 may have

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Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, February 3, 1807- March 21, 1891.  He was born near Farmville, Virginia the son of Peter Johnston at Longwood, Cherry Grove.  Attending West Point he graduated with Gen. Robert E. Lee in 1829, after which serving in the Seminole and Mexican wars.  In 1860, he was appointed Quarter Master General of the army, though he resigned his commission, as the civil war divided the nation, to defend his native state.

Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, February 3, 1807- March 21, 1891. He was born near Farmville, Virginia the son of Peter Johnston at Longwood, Cherry Grove. Attending West Point he graduated with Gen. Robert E. Lee in 1829, after which serving in the Seminole and Mexican wars. In 1860, he was appointed Quarter Master General of the army, though he resigned his commission, as the civil war divided the nation, to defend his native state.

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Learning of Lee's surrender at Appomattox on April 9, General Joseph Johnston began surrender talks with Sherman at Bennett Place, NC. After extensive negotiations, Johnston surrendered the nearly 90,000 troops in his departments on April 26. After the surrender, Sherman gave Johnston's starving men ten days' rations, a gesture that the Confederate commander never forgot.

Learning of Lee's surrender at Appomattox on April 9, General Joseph Johnston began surrender talks with Sherman at Bennett Place, NC. After extensive negotiations, Johnston surrendered the nearly 90,000 troops in his departments on April 26. After the surrender, Sherman gave Johnston's starving men ten days' rations, a gesture that the Confederate commander never forgot.

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Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. Called "Uncle Joe" by his men, he was well liked by his soldiers; fought Sherman before Atlanta and then later in the Carolinas. The Battle of Bentonville was his last, desperate effort to halt Sherman; see Chapter 27 of Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War.

Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. Called "Uncle Joe" by his men, he was well liked by his soldiers; fought Sherman before Atlanta and then later in the Carolinas. The Battle of Bentonville was his last, desperate effort to halt Sherman; see Chapter 27 of Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War.

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Relieved of his command after the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, General Joe Johnston had failed to guard Snake Creek Gap, which was his Achilles' Heel.

Relieved of his command after the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, General Joe Johnston had failed to guard Snake Creek Gap, which was his Achilles' Heel.

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supposed Cousin General Joseph E Johnston. Have not been able to confirm this yet.

supposed Cousin General Joseph E Johnston. Have not been able to confirm this yet.

General Joseph Johnson (Confederate) (1807-1891). With the rank of brigadier general as Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army, Johnson was the highest ranking officer to join the Confederacy. After the war, he served as a commissioner of railroads in the administration of President Grover Cleveland. Photo taken by Mathew Brady. (Library of Congress).

General Joseph Johnson (Confederate) (1807-1891). With the rank of brigadier general as Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army, Johnson was the highest ranking officer to join the Confederacy. After the war, he served as a commissioner of railroads in the administration of President Grover Cleveland. Photo taken by Mathew Brady. (Library of Congress).

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Civil War Confederate Generals | Gen. J.E. Johnston, C.S.A. L he and Sherman would be friends until their deaths a month apart

Civil War Confederate Generals | Gen. J.E. Johnston, C.S.A. L he and Sherman would be friends until their deaths a month apart

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LOC 1917. This is a Photograph of soldiers at Camp Joseph E. Johnston.

LOC 1917. This is a Photograph of soldiers at Camp Joseph E. Johnston.

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