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from NPR.org

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Carapella has designed maps of Canada and the continental U.S. showing the original locations and names of Native American tribes. View the full map (PDF).

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from LittleThings.com

Century-Old Photos Of Native American Tribes Bring History To Life

Edward S. Curtis was a renowned American ethnologist and photographer of the American West and Native American people. http://www.littlethings.com/edward-curtis-native-americans/?utm_source=proj&utm_campaign=inspiring&utm_medium=Facebook

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from Oral Tradition Wiki

List and maps of Native American tribes

Situated mostly in the Northwest United States and in Canada after migrating from the Great Lakes region, the Blackfoot Indians have a rich history and culture.Blackfoot Indians were legendary buffalo hunters, and lived a mostly nomadic life following the buffalo herds.

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Native American Tribes Location map. If you right click on this image and go to view image, you should be able to download it full size.

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Did you know the name "Texas" comes from a Caddoan Indian word? It is a Spanish corruption of the Caddo word Taysha, which means "friend." Spanish explorers recorded it as Teyas or Tejas.

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Native American Nations. Many have "break off" Tribes. Example~ the Apache have > the White Mountain Apache, the Muscalero Apache, the Lipan Apache, etc.

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*The Dakota Sioux tribe http://www.native-languages.org/dakota.htm http://www.native-languages.org/dakota.htm#language *The Ojibwe tribe (also known as Chippewa, Ojibway, or Ojibwa) http://www.native-languages.org/chippewa.htm http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe.htm#language http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe_guide.htm show the pronunciation for the Ojibwe orthography

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"Did you know the name "Mississippi" is an Algonkian Indian word? It comes from words meaning "big river" in Ojibway and other northern Algonquian languages. The Mississippi River begins in northern Minnesota, where the Ojibway people live, and that is where the name of the river came from. There were never any Ojibway people in the state of Mississippi."

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