Pilot Whale Attack. Pilot whales are cetaceans belonging to the genus Globicephala. There are two extant species, the long-finned pilot whale and the short-finned pilot whale. The photographer had close encounter with pilot whales in the Strait of Gibraltar. Have a look at the stunning video in the next pin.

Environment

Pilot Whale Attack. Pilot whales are cetaceans belonging to the genus Globicephala. There are two extant species, the long-finned pilot whale and the short-finned pilot whale. The photographer had close encounter with pilot whales in the Strait of Gibraltar. Have a look at the stunning video in the next pin.

Pilot whale - Globicephala melas Although pilot whales occasionally eat fish, their major diet is squid. And like many other squid eaters, they have relatively few teeth - about nine in each jaw.

Pilot whale - Globicephala melas Although pilot whales occasionally eat fish, their major diet is squid. And like many other squid eaters, they have relatively few teeth - about nine in each jaw.

Photographer has close encounter with pilot whales in the Strait of Gibraltar.

Photographer has close encounter with pilot whales in the Strait of Gibraltar

Photographer has close encounter with pilot whales in the Strait of Gibraltar.

Pilot Whale  Pilot whales swim off Kona, Hawaii. Oceanic whitetip sharks sometimes follow pods of these whales, possibly eating scraps of prey left behind.

Pilot Whale Pilot whales swim off Kona, Hawaii. Oceanic whitetip sharks sometimes follow pods of these whales, possibly eating scraps of prey left behind.

Pilot Whales in the Strait of Gibraltar

Having a whale of a time: The 20ft sea giant who couldn't resist smiling for the camera

A whale flashes a killer smile as he homes in on his lunch, off Kona, Hawaii.The photograph shows what appears to be a big grin plastered across the face of a False Killer Whale as he patrols the sea looking for food. American photographer Doug Perrine, 60, snapped the shot

Pictures of the day: 21 March 2013

A whale flashes a killer smile as he homes in on his lunch, off Kona, Hawaii.The photograph shows what appears to be a big grin plastered across the face of a False Killer Whale as he patrols the sea looking for food. American photographer Doug Perrine, 60, snapped the shot

Pilot Whale

Pilot Whale

Such intelligent species  ||  #SavingtheWaves  Pilot whales emit echolocation clicks for foraging and whistles and burst pulses as social signals. With active behavior vocalizations are more complex while less-active behavior is accompanied by simple vocalizations. Differences have been found in the calls of the two species. Compared with short-finned pilot whales long-finned pilot whales have relatively low-frequency calls with narrow frequency ranges.  In one study of North Atlantic…

Such intelligent species || #SavingtheWaves Pilot whales emit echolocation clicks for foraging and whistles and burst pulses as social signals. With active behavior vocalizations are more complex while less-active behavior is accompanied by simple vocalizations. Differences have been found in the calls of the two species. Compared with short-finned pilot whales long-finned pilot whales have relatively low-frequency calls with narrow frequency ranges. In one study of North Atlantic…

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