K.5 Railway Gun Leopold This gun was captured in Italy after it, and a second gun ("Robert"), had been firing on the Anzio beach head. The Germans built 25 units by the end of WWII.

K.5 Railway Gun Leopold This gun was captured in Italy after it, and a second gun ("Robert"), had been firing on the Anzio beach head. The Germans built 25 units by the end of WWII.

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British 14inch Railway gun. Originally built to arm the Japanese Battleship Yamashiro they were never delivered and were converted into Rail Artillery near the close of WWI in 1918.

British 14inch Railway gun. Originally built to arm the Japanese Battleship Yamashiro they were never delivered and were converted into Rail Artillery near the close of WWI in 1918.

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British Army officers pose next to projectiles fired by the "Dora" railway gun. Dora and its sibling "Gustav" were 80 cm guns developed in the late 1930s by Krupp as siege artillery for the purpose of destroying the French Maginot Line fortifications. The guns could fire shells weighing seven tonnes to a range of 47 km (29 mi). Gustav was captured by US troops and cut up, whilst Dora was destroyed near the end of the war in 1945 to avoid capture by the Red Army.

British Army officers pose next to projectiles fired by the "Dora" railway gun. Dora and its sibling "Gustav" were 80 cm guns developed in the late 1930s by Krupp as siege artillery for the purpose of destroying the French Maginot Line fortifications. The guns could fire shells weighing seven tonnes to a range of 47 km (29 mi). Gustav was captured by US troops and cut up, whilst Dora was destroyed near the end of the war in 1945 to avoid capture by the Red Army.

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"Boche-Buster", a 250-ton 18-inch railway gun, Catterick, 12 December 1940. The gun later travelled down to Kent to take up position at Bishopsbourne on the Elham to Canterbury Line, taken over by the Army for the duration of WW2. The gun was in fact an 18 inch howitzer.

"Boche-Buster", a 250-ton 18-inch railway gun, Catterick, 12 December 1940. The gun later travelled down to Kent to take up position at Bishopsbourne on the Elham to Canterbury Line, taken over by the Army for the duration of WW2. The gun was in fact an 18 inch howitzer.

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"Gustav Gun" built in Essen, Germany in 1941. The strategic weapon of its day, the Gustav Gun was built at the direct order of Adolf Hitler for the express purpose of crushing Maginot Line forts protecting the French frontier. To accomplish this, Krupp designed a giant railway gun weighing 1344 tons with a bore diameter of 800 mm (31.5") and served by a 500 man crew commanded by a major-general.

"Gustav Gun" built in Essen, Germany in 1941. The strategic weapon of its day, the Gustav Gun was built at the direct order of Adolf Hitler for the express purpose of crushing Maginot Line forts protecting the French frontier. To accomplish this, Krupp designed a giant railway gun weighing 1344 tons with a bore diameter of 800 mm (31.5") and served by a 500 man crew commanded by a major-general.

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The massive German 203mm railway gun. The shell went up 40 miles into the sky before it fell back onto its target.

The massive German 203mm railway gun. The shell went up 40 miles into the sky before it fell back onto its target.

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Schwerer Gustav (English: Heavy Gustaf, or Great Gustaf) and Dora were the names of two massive World War 2 German 80 cm K (E) railway siege guns.

Schwerer Gustav (English: Heavy Gustaf, or Great Gustaf) and Dora were the names of two massive World War 2 German 80 cm K (E) railway siege guns.

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10 Famous and Notorious Guns from History -        There are now more than three hundred million guns in the United States of America alone. At the end of World War II in 1945, the Soviet army was shelling Berlin with 43,000 artillery pieces. So whatever your opinion on how they should be regulated in America, guns have been a gigantic... - http://toptenz.net

10 Famous and Notorious Guns from History - There are now more than three hundred million guns in the United States of America alone. At the end of World War II in 1945, the Soviet army was shelling Berlin with 43,000 artillery pieces. So whatever your opinion on how they should be regulated in America, guns have been a gigantic... - http://toptenz.net

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