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The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding on December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama when she was arrested for her refusal to give up her seat to a white person which sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

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Rosa Parks quote: People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. The only tired I was, was tired of giving in. Link to her biography on Black History: http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/rosa-parks

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Nice The 60th Anniversary of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat and the beginning of The Montgomery Bus Boycott

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Rosa Parks (1913 - 2005) Rosa Parks was an African American civil rights activist who refused to obey a bus driver's order that she give up her sit for a white passenger. Through her brave civil disobedience actions, she became an important symbol of the modern Civil Rights Movement in the U.S.

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from The Huffington Post

9 Things Women Couldn't Do In 1913 -- And 3 Things They Still Can't

Rosa Parks refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man indirectly led to some of the most significant civil rights legislation of American history. She sought to play down her role in the civil rights struggle but for her peaceful and dignified campaigning she became one of the most well respected figures in the civil rights movements.

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from Retro Planet

Go Mod with a '60s- and '70s Style Dining Booth

There is no one who embodies standing up to inequality better than Rosa Parks.

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Rosa Parks: Change the world in a single bus ride? Rosa Parks did. Parks wasn’t the first African American to refuse to give up her seat for a white passenger on public transit, but she was the one who sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which made the US civil rights movement world news. Parks reminds us that even small acts of defiance can have a huge impact. Photo: Mickey Adair

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While most people remember Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, they forget that the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeeded because of the participation of tens of thousands of ordinary people. These women and men risked their lives and jobs to keep the boycott alive. Many, like this woman, walked instead of riding the segregated buses.

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