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inkyami: “ Leshy ([Leshii’] рус. Леший “Forest man”) — a woodland spirit, the master of forests in east-slavic (and most-commonly russian) mythology, protector of local flora and fauna. In most tales...


Sirin – the half-woman, half-bird creature emerging from Russian mythology, which in all its many forms most closely approximates the figure of the Muse or Inspiration, soothing, gentle and incredibly lyrical. In an enigmatic etching, "The Eternal Game," the Sirin appears in a vision before a woman playing a game of chess; following a mystical strain, the etching seems to suggest that the Sirin is the woman’s alter ego and that the game she is really playing is a game of identity.


Svyatogor is the giant-warrior in Russian mythology and folklore. His name is a derivation from the words "sacred mountain". He and his mighty steed are so large that, when they ride forth, the crest of his helmet sweeps away the clouds.


VEDMAK - In Slavic mythology, a Vědmák (Russian: Ведьмак; Ukrainian: Відьмак, Vidmak or Polish: Wiedźmin[1]) is a male witch, the female equivalent being vedma,[2] but unlike the latter, the vedmak may also possess positive qualities. For example, they treat people and animals,[3] protect humanity, and force witches to stop doing evil. On the other hand, they are thought to be people connected to the Devil, and are capable of harming other human beings


Gamayun, one of three prophetic birds of Russian folklore, alongside Alkonost and Sirin (painting by Viktor Vasnetsov, 1897).


The Evening Star is Zorya Vechernyaya (from Russian vecher, meaning “evening”), a goddess of dusk who is depicted as a fully armed and courageous warrior. She was associated with the planet Mercury. Some myths cast both Zorya as virgin goddesses who had the specific job of grooming their father’s white horses, but other accounts saythey married the moon god Myesyats and gave birth to the stars. Ancient Slavs would pray to Zorya Vechernyaya each evening as the sun set.


The firebird is symbolic of light and it is said that when one feather from the tail of the firebird falls to the ground, a new artistic tradition is born, hence why it is such a popular motif amongst artists.


Baba yaga: In Russian folklore there are many stories of Baba Yaga, the fearsome witch with iron teeth. Whenever she appears on the scene, a wild wind begins to blow, the trees around creak and groan and leaves whirl through the air. Shrieking and wailing, a host of spirits often accompany her on her way ...


Baba Yaga - James Schultz - In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga is a supernatural being (or one of a trio of sisters of the same name) who appears as a deformed and/or ferocious-looking woman.