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The Peterbrough Chronicle. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles refer to a collection of old writings and manuscripts kept by monasteries across England. They are written in blackletter and tell the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The recording started in the 9th century during the reign of Alfred the Great and stopped at different times in different regions. The Peterborough chronicle was still being updated as late as 1154.

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The Danelaw, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the "Danes" held sway[1] and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. It is contrasted with "West Saxon law" and "Mercian law". The term has been extended by modern historians to be geographical. The areas that comprised the Danelaw are in northern and eastern England.

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King Alfred the Great. (871-899) House of Wessex. Queen Elizabeth II's 32nd great-grandfather! Succeeded his brother Aethelred. Defended England against Danish invasion and founded the first English navy. He encouraged the translation of scholarly works from Latin (some he translated himself) and promoted the development of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. This ensured his deeds were recorded in history. We know more about him than any other Anglo Saxon King. Succeeded by son, Edward.

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"Cornweallas" shown on an early 19th-century map of "Saxon England" (and Wales) based on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

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Edgar the Peaceful 959-975 House of Wessex. Second son of Edmund I. Well educated. Very handsome, but short; this did not stop him from having many mistresses. Restored peace with the church and throughout the kingdom. England was unified as a kingdom and organised into the shires that still exist today. His coronation is the first described in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, and is the ceremony followed since then to the present day.

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The Vikings have had an image problem. Long regarded as fierce marauders, raiding and pillaging their way from Lindisfarne to Constantinople, they are history’s ultimate pirates. More recently an attempt to focusing on their wider culture and their role as traders. They alternately traded with and terrified Anglo-Saxons, Franks and Slavs, and inspired fearsome chronicles by the monks of wealthy monasteries in the north and the historians of the Islamic Caliphate.

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Most of the information we have about the Anglo-Saxons comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a year-by-year account of all the major events of the time. Description from gaukartifact.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

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Æthelflæd: d. 918; Æthelflæd, Lady of the Mercians, was the eldest daughter of Alfred the Great, king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, and his queen, Ealhswith. Æthelflæd was born at the height of the Viking invasions of England. Her father married her to Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians, also known as 'Æthelred, Ealdorman of Mercia'. After his death in 911 she ruled Mercia, until her own death in 918. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle referred to her as the Myrcna hlæfdige, 'Lady of the…

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