Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

The Core of our Galxy, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.

480
122
2

Galactic Center Region | The sites will unveil a giant, 6-foot-by-3-foot print of the bustling hub of our galaxy that combines a near-infrared view from the Hubble Space Telescope, an infrared view from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and an X-ray view from the Chandra X-ray Observatory into one multiwavelength picture. Experts from all three observatories carefully assembled the final image from large mosaic photo surveys taken by each telescope.

243
42
2

A nebula known as "Spider" green fluorescent lights in an infrared Spitzer Space Telescope image of NASA and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The spider, the official name of IC 417, is close to a much smaller object called NGC 1931, not shown in the picture. Together, the two are called "The Spider and the Fly". The spider, located about 10,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Auriga, is clearly a site of star formation.

194
24

The Mountains of Creation nebula (W5) from the Spitzer space telescope. The image, dubbed the Mountains of Creation by astronomers, reveals hotbeds of star formation similar to the iconic Pillars of Creation within the Eagle Nebula, photographed in 1995 by the Hubble Space Telescope.

597
101

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared One of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope

303
43
3

The #SombreroGalaxy in Infrared One of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope

265
99

~~Dust and the Helix Nebula ~ Dust makes this cosmic eye look red. Spitzer Space Telescope image.

466
74
1

'Pandora's Cluster' Seen by Spitzer Space Telescope - SpaceAim.com