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Posterior Parietal Lobe - Supplementary motor area

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premotor (PMC) supplementary motor area

Why Sleep Is The Secret Ingredient To Learning Sports Skills. Before REM sleep, our brain enters a deeper phase known as “slow-wave” sleep, where embryonic neural networks solidify the new motor skills and knowledge learned earlier. Researchers found learning “spindles” in the supplementary motor area, located near the primary motor cortex. New neuronal connections there seemed to be the storage area for the latest skill memory.

from Science News

Stimulating nerve cells stretches time between thinking, doing

BRAIN BUZZ  Using transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS, to zap two brain areas prompted people to report that their intent to click a mouse arose earlier than those of people who didn’t receive tDCS (top bar) or who had the supplementary motor area stimulated.  ~~ Source: Z. Douglas et al/Journal of Neuroscience 2015; adapted by E. Otwell

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Scientists scan a woman's brain during out of body experience: There’s obviously something happening in her brain that is making her experience the world in a different way, stimulating the supplementary motor area, the cerebellum, the supramarginal gyrus, the inferior temporal gyrus, the middle and superior orbitofrontal gyri.

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Google Image Result for http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/a/a_06/a_06_cr/a_06_cr_mou/a_06_cr_mou_1a.jpg

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The regions of the cerebral cortex that give rise to the corticospinal tract. MI = primary motor cortex; PMC = premotor cortex; PPC = posterior parietal cortex; SI = primary somatosensory receiving area; SMA = supplementary motor area. Note that the PPC does not contribute to the corticospinal tract but does modulate its activity.

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Social learning appears to be a part of what our submissive nature grew to include. Originally the mimicking trend of flock and pack may have been a defensive measure. Find if these sections receive dopamine from brain stem. In humans, brain activity consistent with that of mirror neurons has been found in the premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, the primary somatosensory cortex and the inferior parietal cortex.[6]

A new study reveals a link between brain activation, cardiorespiratory fitness and executive function in older adults. Share NeuroscienceShare on TumblrPocketPress ThisEmailPrint

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