Considered to be one of the most beautiful coins of ancient China. Cast in the years 7-9 AD during the reign of Wang Mang, Xin Dynasty (7 - 23 AD). This knife money is popularly known as金错刀 or gold inlaid knife. The lower blade portion of the coin has the characters平五千which translates as "worth five thousand".

Considered to be one of the most beautiful coins of ancient China. Cast in the years 7-9 AD during the reign of Wang Mang, Xin Dynasty (7 - 23 AD). This knife money is popularly known as金错刀 or gold inlaid knife. The lower blade portion of the coin has the characters平五千which translates as "worth five thousand".

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Chinese Empire, Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang (9-23 AD), Spade Money Big Pu (Value 1000), after 10 AD. Wang Mang's spade coins had face values from 200 to 1000 copper coins. This piece bears the inscription "one spade worth 1000" – meaning 1000 round copper coins, the so-called wu shu.

Chinese Empire, Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang (9-23 AD), Spade Money Big Pu (Value 1000), after 10 AD. Wang Mang's spade coins had face values from 200 to 1000 copper coins. This piece bears the inscription "one spade worth 1000" – meaning 1000 round copper coins, the so-called wu shu.

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Yi Dao Ping Wu Qian (Chinese: 一刀平五千; pinyin: yīdāo píng wǔqiān; literally: "One Knife Worth Five Thousand") on which the Yi Dao characters are inlaid in gold. It was introduced by Wang Mang (Chinese: 王莽, c. 45 BCE – 6 October 23 CE), courtesy name Jujun (巨君), was a Han Dynasty official who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin (or Hsin, meaning "renewed"[1]) Dynasty (新朝), ruling 9–23 CE.He introduced a number of currency reforms which met with varying degrees of success…

Yi Dao Ping Wu Qian (Chinese: 一刀平五千; pinyin: yīdāo píng wǔqiān; literally: "One Knife Worth Five Thousand") on which the Yi Dao characters are inlaid in gold. It was introduced by Wang Mang (Chinese: 王莽, c. 45 BCE – 6 October 23 CE), courtesy name Jujun (巨君), was a Han Dynasty official who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin (or Hsin, meaning "renewed"[1]) Dynasty (新朝), ruling 9–23 CE.He introduced a number of currency reforms which met with varying degrees of success…

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Bronze coin of the Wang Mang Dinasty, 13th century.
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Han dynasty - A spade-shaped bronze coin issued during Wang Mang's (r. 9–23 AD) reign.

Han dynasty - A spade-shaped bronze coin issued during Wang Mang's (r. 9–23 AD) reign.

The Xin Dynasty (新朝) literally "New Dynasty") was a Chinese dynasty (although strictly speaking it had only one emperor) which lasted from AD 9 to 23. It followed the Western Han Dynasty and preceded the Eastern Han Dynasty.    The sole emperor of the Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang (王莽), was the nephew of Grand Empress Dowager Wang Zhengjun. fter the death of her step-grandson Emperor Ai in 1 BC, Wang Mang rose to power. and finally proclaimed himself emperor.

The Xin Dynasty (新朝) literally "New Dynasty") was a Chinese dynasty (although strictly speaking it had only one emperor) which lasted from AD 9 to 23. It followed the Western Han Dynasty and preceded the Eastern Han Dynasty. The sole emperor of the Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang (王莽), was the nephew of Grand Empress Dowager Wang Zhengjun. fter the death of her step-grandson Emperor Ai in 1 BC, Wang Mang rose to power. and finally proclaimed himself emperor.

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19a. Obverse side of a Bu Quan (布泉 or "Spade coin"), cast from AD 9-14 by Han Dynasty usurper Wang Mang who created the Xin Dynasty (7-23 AD). The coinage was too complex and people did not trust it. 26mm in size; 3+ gram3 in weight. S-175. This coin was known later as the Nan Qian (男錢; "Male Cash"), from the belief that if a woman wore this on her sash, she would give birth to a boy. Eventually, Wang Mang's unsuccessful reforms provoked an uprising, and he was killed by rebels in AD 23.

19a. Obverse side of a Bu Quan (布泉 or "Spade coin"), cast from AD 9-14 by Han Dynasty usurper Wang Mang who created the Xin Dynasty (7-23 AD). The coinage was too complex and people did not trust it. 26mm in size; 3+ gram3 in weight. S-175. This coin was known later as the Nan Qian (男錢; "Male Cash"), from the belief that if a woman wore this on her sash, she would give birth to a boy. Eventually, Wang Mang's unsuccessful reforms provoked an uprising, and he was killed by rebels in AD 23.

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