NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is mapping moon craters that have never seen the light of day. See how the powerful probe can peek inside the moon's permanent lunar shadows. - Credit: NASA/GSFC/SVS

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is mapping moon craters that have never seen the light of day. See how the powerful probe can peek inside the moon's permanent lunar shadows. - Credit: NASA/GSFC/SVS

The Hunt for Water on the Moon

The Hunt for Water on the Moon

Aer - Water On The Moon -  Daniel . . . .I'll always remember your ring tone !!!!!!!

Aer - Water On The Moon - Daniel . . . .I'll always remember your ring tone !!!!!!!

This the Genesis Rock, a lunar rock collected during the Apollo 15 mission. Scientists announced that traces of water have been detected within  the sample. The presence of water in such an old rock contradicts long held theories of the Moon's formation - that it formed in a giant collision between Earth and a Mars sized object. A Moon formed in such a way would have been mostly molten during its early life, and liquid water would have been impossible.

Water on the moon: It's been there all along

This the Genesis Rock, a lunar rock collected during the Apollo 15 mission. Scientists announced that traces of water have been detected within the sample. The presence of water in such an old rock contradicts long held theories of the Moon's formation - that it formed in a giant collision between Earth and a Mars sized object. A Moon formed in such a way would have been mostly molten during its early life, and liquid water would have been impossible.

Ever wondered how the moon affects the tides of water on Earth? Long story short, it’s gravity. As the moon orbits the Earth, it exerts a gravitational pull on the Earth. Since the Earth is significantly larger, it doesn't actually move towards the moon, but the water on it's surface, being liquid, does move. Photo of the Atlantic Ocean, captured via drone Benjamin Grant --- FEED — Daily Overview

Ever wondered how the moon affects the tides of water on Earth? Long story short, it’s gravity. As the moon orbits the Earth, it exerts a gravitational pull on the Earth. Since the Earth is significantly larger, it doesn't actually move towards the moon, but the water on it's surface, being liquid, does move. Photo of the Atlantic Ocean, captured via drone Benjamin Grant --- FEED — Daily Overview

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