What is Hanukkah? When is Hanukkah? How is Hanukkah Celebrated? Foods for Hanukkah. History behind Hanukkah, Jewish Festival of Lights. Chanukkah

What is Hanukkah? When is Hanukkah? How is Hanukkah Celebrated? Foods for Hanukkah. History behind Hanukkah, Jewish Festival of Lights. Chanukkah

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explanation of hanukkah | What is the deal with Hanukkah, anyway? is an infographic that ...

explanation of hanukkah | What is the deal with Hanukkah, anyway? is an infographic that ...

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Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights. It usually falls in late November or December on the secular calendar.

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights. It usually falls in late November or December on the secular calendar.

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When is Hanukkah (Chanukah) in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017? - Site Features - Chanukah - Hanukkah

When is Hanukkah (Chanukah) in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017? - Site Features - Chanukah - Hanukkah

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Judaism & Jewish Life - My Jewish Learning.  Excellent educational blog for understanding Judaism.

Judaism & Jewish Life - My Jewish Learning. Excellent educational blog for understanding Judaism.

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How could I not have pinned this already.. This is gorgeous and I will be making this !

How could I not have pinned this already.. This is gorgeous and I will be making this !

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Chanukah is the Jewish eight-day, wintertime “festival of lights,” celebrated with a nightly menorah lighting, special prayers and fried foods. The Hebrew word Chanukah means “dedication,” and is thus named because it celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple (as you’ll read below). Also spelled Hanukkah (or variations of that spelling), the Hebrew word is actually pronounced with a guttural, “kh” sound, kha-nu-kah, not tcha-new-kah.

Chanukah is the Jewish eight-day, wintertime “festival of lights,” celebrated with a nightly menorah lighting, special prayers and fried foods. The Hebrew word Chanukah means “dedication,” and is thus named because it celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple (as you’ll read below). Also spelled Hanukkah (or variations of that spelling), the Hebrew word is actually pronounced with a guttural, “kh” sound, kha-nu-kah, not tcha-new-kah.

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