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Yayoi Kusama. Yayoi Kusama (草間 彌生 b.1929) is a Japanese artist and writer.She has worked in a wide variety of media, including painting, collage, sculpture, performance art, and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition and pattern.Periods: Contemporary art, Pop art, Minimalism. The polka dot features heavily in her work.

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"the Obliteration Room" - Yayoi Kusama -   Over a two-week period, the museum gave its young visitors stickers and let them decorate the all-white room. Here's what happened...

"the Obliteration Room" - Yayoi Kusama - Over a two-week period, the museum gave its young visitors stickers and let them decorate the all-white room. Here's what happened...

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One of the biggest question marks remains over whether Himiko was a queen or more of a shaman. "I would love to be able to excavate the tomb, but it is impossible to get permission because the agency says that our present emperor is descended from Queen Himiko," said Professor Harunari. "But I still believe the evidence fits and this is her tomb."

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The japanese chronological table. preceramic period. jomon-era. yayoi-era. kofun-era. asuka-era. nara-era. heian-era. kamakura-era. muromachi-era. nanbokucho-era. sengoku-era. aduchi-momoyama-era. edo-era. bakumatsu. meiji-era. taisho-era. syouwa. heisei.

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The Kofun period is named after the tomb mounds that were built for members of the ruling class. The practice of building sepulchral mounds and burying treasures with the dead was transmitted to Japan from China about the third century A.D. In the late 4th-5th century, mounds of monumental proportions were built in great numbers, symbolizing the increasingly unified power of the government. In the late fifth century, power fell to the Yamato clan, which won control over much of Honshu island…

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Dogū - Small humanoid and animal figures made during the late Jomon period (14,000-400 BC) of prehistoric Japan. By the Yayoi period, which followed the Jomon period, Dogu were no longer made.

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Bell (dotaku), late Yayoi period (ca. 4th century B.C.–3rd century A.D.), 1st–2nd century Japan | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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